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water treatment

Turkey Farm testimonial

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January 22  |  Case Studies, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Nutrition, Poultry, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

The main reason I was interested in trying out Puroxi (Oxy Blast) was due to the poor water quality at Pine Park Farms. Each barn at the farm has its own separate well with different mineral levels but what they all have in common is a high level of manganese.

Before switching to Puroxi (OB), I was using chlorine as the daily water sanitation product for my turkey farm. The interaction between the chlorine and the manganese produced a thick black slime/sludge that would coat all of the waterlines and pug them up over time. To try to clear up the water going into the barn, I had tried a variety of different water filtration systems from a few different water filtration companies. None of them seemed to be able to keep up and would plug up over time. The switch from chlorine to Puroxi (Oxy Blast) has eliminated this problem.

The Puroxi (OB) does not react with the manganese and has actually over time removed all off the black slime and sludge throughout all of my waterlines. The waterlines are now cleaner than they have ever been.

ThePuroxi (OB) also seems to work extremely effectively as a daily disinfectant. I am able to achieve the same level ofPuroxi (OB) from the start of my waterlines to the end of the waterlines. This is quite a feat as one of the barns is over 600 ft long. The litter conditions in the barns have improved and the litter is not as wet as with the chlorinated water.

Another big improvement has been in the feed conversion for turkey Toms. Where I previously achieved an average of 2.4 feed conversion in 16wk/16.5kg toms, I have now averaged an 2.25 feed conversion for 16wk/16.5kg toms.

I am going to attach a few photos so you can see the improvements of one of the cistern tanks and a small filter to show how the Puroxi (Oxy Blast) has cleared up my water lines. You are welcome to use these in the article if you want.

 

LEFT – This is what a small simple filter looked like with the chlorine treatment. The water flowing through this small filter was filtered first by large iron eating filters.

 

RIGHT – This photo is the exact same filter, after using the Puroxi (OB)

 

The following are above-view photos from one of my cistern tanks –

 

 

Before the start of using the Puroxi (OB);

 

 

1 week later after the use of Puroxi (OB). The brown/black residue has been coming off the sides and settling on the bottom of the tank; 

 

 

Less than 4 weeks after starting Puroxi (OB). What a remarkable & welcome difference!

 

 

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Water for Livestock

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January 20  |  antibiotics, Beef, Business Opportunity, Case Studies, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water, testimonials  |   Webmaster

Providing enough quality water is essential for good livestock husbandry.

Water makes up 80% of the blood, regulates body temperature and is vital for organ functions such as digestion, waste removal, the absorption of nutrients (feed conversion), lactation, and much more. Understanding daily livestock watering needs is key when designing a livestock watering system.

The daily water requirement of livestock varies significantly depending on animal species, size and growth stage. Environmental aspects as well as the QUALITY of water, also impact the amount of water intake. PUROXI improves the quality of your water and delivery systems ensuring your livestock will drink the recommended amount.

Click on the links below for additional information, facts, and articles of interest. You can also use the Search function tool (top right corner) to find items of interest.

Water Requirements for Livestock

Advantages of PUROXI Water Treatment

Product brochures for various species

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Water for Beef Cattle

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January 20  |  Beef, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

Adequate clean fresh water is the cornerstone to animal husbandry.

Cows (& calves) need plenty of quality drinking water, especially during the hot summer months. Water consumption increases proportionately as ambient temperature increases above 40 F degrees. Also, lactation increases the amount of water required by beef cows.

An adequate source of fresh, clean, good-tasting water will ensure that the cows drink as much water as they need, resulting in good feed conversion and lactation.

For detailed information from various qualified sources, please click on the links below. You can also use our Search box feature at the top right corner of the page, to access many other studies, reports, and articles of interest.

Water for Beef Cattle

Organic Cow-Calf Testimonial

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Water for Dairy

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January 20  |  Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Research, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

The importance of water quality and intake for dairy farms cannot be over-stated and is worth repeating.

Water is one of the most important, yet often neglected, nutrients for the cow. Water ranks second, only to oxygen, in importance to the cow.

Lack of water will reduce dry matter (feed) intake and production. Also, water quality will impact water intake, and cows are more sensitive than people to poor water quality.

For more detailed information from government and academia sources, please click on the links below. Also, feel free to use our Search box function (top right corner) to find additional material and articles of interest.

Water Quality and Intake for Dairy

Water Quality for Cattle

Water Quality for Dairy Cattle

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Safe Drinking Water for All

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August 31  |  Case Studies, News, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

California lawmakers are considering a plan to help poor communities afflicted by contaminated water. It could be a model for the nation.

By Laurel Firestone and Susana De Anda

Ms. Firestone and Ms. De Anda run a non-profit in California’s San Joaquin Valley focused on solving drinking water problems.

A taped water fountain spout in 2016 at Foothill Intermediate School in Loma Rica, Calif. About one million Californians have contaminated drinking water.CreditRich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

SACRAMENTO — In 2007, the small town of Lanare in California’s Central Valley finally got what it had desperately needed for years — a treatment plant to remove high levels of arsenic in the drinking water. But the victory was short-lived. Just months after the $1.3 million federally funded plant began running, the town was forced to shut it down because it ran out of money to operate and maintain it.

More than a decade later, the plant remains closed and Lanare’s tap water is still contaminated — as is the drinking water piped to about a million other Californians around the state. The common barrier to solving the problem is that communities lack access to government financing to run their water treatment systems.

Now, for the first time, a solution is within reach in California. State lawmakers are expected to vote this month to establish reliable funding sources to help ensure, for the first time, that all state residents have access to safe and affordable drinking water. It could be a model for other states.

Ensuring safe drinking water has become “a growing challenge in the face of aging infrastructure, impaired source water and strained community finances,” a study published in February in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found.

In 2015, the same year that the water crisis in Flint, Mich., made headlines, more than 21 million people nationwide relied on drinking water systems that violated basic legal health standards, according to the study. Throughout the country, low-income communities disproportionately bear the brunt of this crisis. In California, drinking water contamination is most likely to afflict small, low-income communities of color, particularly Latino farmworker communities that have not benefited from the tremendous economic growth in the San Francisco Bay Area and other urban centers. However, nearly every county in the state has a system without safe drinking water.

In 2012, after a hard-fought grass-roots campaign, California became the first and only state to pass a right-to-water act. That bill enshrined “safe, clean, affordable and accessible water adequate for human consumption, cooking and sanitary purposes” as a basic human right. Yet more than five years later, legislators have yet to take the bold actions necessary to make that guarantee a reality.

Hundreds of communities in California still lack access to safe drinking water in their homes, schools, parks and businesses. Some families spend up to 10 percent of their income on clean water, having to pay for bottled water on top of their monthly water bills. At the same time, leaders of local water boards have been frustrated in their efforts to improve conditions because their financially stretched water systems are ineligible for grants and loans for treatment upgrades.

This is not just a problem in California. As the recent study in the National Academy of Sciences journal found, “regulatory compliance” with drinking water regulations “can be a challenge for rural systems due to limited financial resources and technical expertise.” The study also noted that small systems “face restricted access to loans and outside financing.”

Now a solution may be at hand in California. After more than a decade of intense community activism, negotiations and studies, a plan to help communities tackle drinking water problems has won the support not only of environmental justice and public health advocates but also of leaders from business, agriculture, labor and many local governments and water suppliers, though not all.

The bipartisan proposal would establish a Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund financed by fees assessed on dairy producers and fertilizer manufacturers, and by voluntary, 95-cent-per-month contributions by water customers through their water bills.

The agricultural fee revenues would be targeted to address nitrate contamination from fertilizers, a common problem in farming areas. Money raised by the voluntary contributions, which would be collected from water customers unless they opt out, would be directed to disadvantaged communities suffering from water contamination caused by a range of pollutants, such as arsenic and uranium. Together, these sources are expected to raise $100 million or more a year.

A recent survey found that nearly 70 percent of Californians would be willing to pay an additional dollar a month on their water bills to ensure safe drinking water for everyone. Now it is up to the California Legislature to pass this legislation and send it to the governor before the session ends on Aug. 31. This would help realize the promise lawmakers made in 2012 when they made safe drinking water a basic human right.

 

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/21/opinion/environment/safe-drinking-water-for-all.html

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Video

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June 25  |  crops, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

We invite you to view our short 3 minute presentation to introduce you to Puroxi Pure Water Global Inc. ~ an international company recognized as a leader in Water Treatment for farms, crops, residential, municipal, commercial applications.

 

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Bottled Water vs. Tap Water

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November 9  |  Case Studies, News, Research, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

Which is Safer?

Concerns over drugs, chemicals, and contaminants in tap water has prompted people all over the world to buy bottled water.  Recent studies have shown that 3 out of 10 households in Canada drink bottled water at home.

It’s estimated that 2.4 billion litres of bottled water were sold in Canada alone last year; about 68 litres per capita.  In fact, bottled water sales have surpassed milk and beer sales in North America, representing a $170 billion industry.

tap water bottled water

 

 

 

 

 

 

But is bottled water necessarily safer or healthier?  A recent investigation compiled by CBC News and reported by Kazi Stastna, provides a well-researched 7 point comparison of water quality, health risks, sustainability and impact on the environment.

At Puroxi, we maintain that proper treatment of an existing water source will provide safe, clean, clear, and nutritonal water, as well as many benefits, without affecting the quality and sustainability of our environment.

Please click here to view the CBC report.

 

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Providing Safe Water in a Disaster

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November 9  |  Editorial, Emergency Preparedness, News, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

by Mark Owen – founder CEO of Puralytics
 
Every year, our planet experiences an average of 500 natural disasters (Gutierrez, 2008). While some have minimal impact, others may disrupt our standard of living for days, weeks, or even months- restricting our access to food, medical care, and potable water sources. In a recent report by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, more than 32.4 million people were displaced worldwide by natural disasters in 2012 (Activity Report 2012, 2013). In an assessment of all global risks, water crises was the 3rdlargest risk, and the one identified as having the largest impact and the most likely to occur (Jennifer Blanke, 2014).
 

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Figure 1: Aid workers in Tacloban City, Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan bring SolarBags for their own use.

Disaster & Water

In a disaster, electricity is lost and water infrastructure is damaged. Fresh water sources might be polluted with all of the chemical toxins in the region as well as sewage and physical debris. First responders refer to the “Rule of Threes” – 3 minutes without air, 3 days without water, and 3 weeks without food/shelter and people will die. In recent disasters, like the Typhoon in the Philippines, the Tsunami in Japan, Hurricane Sandy and Katrina, and the earthquakes in Haiti, for instance, by Day 3 of the crisis, water became extremely valuable – the most expensive water on the planet – flown in by helicopters by emergency medical personnel and first responders, or supplied by desalination systems on battleships in the harbor. In many of these disasters, the water need continued for 3-18 months after the initial disaster had passed, and became the greatest risk of survival.

In the first days of such a crisis, bottled water is often flown in and distributed, both for the protection of the aid workers and emergency responders, and for those immediately displaced by the disaster. Stored or supplied bottled water runs out in a few days. Within the first week or so, it becomes impractical to supply water this way, and aid agencies switch to interim disinfection strategies like boiling water, chlorine or iodine tablets. These are able to partially disinfect the water and filters can remove some particulates, but they are not able to remove the chemical toxins that are also in the available water sources. While is it is widely recognized that water must be both disinfected and detoxified to be a safe water source, disinfection only solutions are acceptable for short periods as outbreaks are the largest short term risk.

These minimalist disinfection-only solutions were satisfactory for short term solutions with clear water sources, but as the disaster expands to weeks and months, the shortcomings of these methods become significant. Chemical toxins left in the water from the disaster, like petrochemicals, pesticides, cleaning supplies, pharmaceuticals, heavy metals, etc. become a significant threat to health that could impact those affected for years to come. Unfortunately, most people who prepare for a disaster, and most government and aid organization that provide support after a disaster do not have equipment to detoxify the water from these chemical toxins. Water quality quickly becomes the biggest risk after the first days of the crisis, and may continue to be for weeks, months, or even years ahead.

The Puralytics SolarBag is unique in an emergency, because it can both disinfect and detoxify the water, providing safe water that meets US EPA and World Health Organization’s “highly protective” safe water guidelines as shown in Figure 2. Sunlight, even on a cloudy day, activates the nanotechnology coated mesh insert, activating 5 photochemical processes that purify water and reduce or destroy contaminants found in virtually all water sources.

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Figure 2: Comparing different water treatment technologies, only one is able to both disinfect and detoxify the water.

The SolarBag can treat up to 9 liters of water per day and can be reused over 500 times.
It can be stored for 7 years or more, and can be used by anyone, even children, to purify virtually any water source to make safe water. It is also very light to transport – while 1 gallon of water weighs about 8 lbs, 1 SolarBag which can make 500 gallons weighs only 4 ounces. Imagine if the aid organizations passed out SolarBags instead of bottled water or chlorine tablets in the early days of a disaster how many more people would be helped in a time of need.

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Figure 3: Planning for an emergency longer than 3 days requires being able to treat water to both disinfect and detoxify the water.

While this patented technology is relatively new and only mentioned in the most recent survival handbooks, it is widely available in stores and online sources. It has also been shipped to over 50 countries, including the recent disaster in the Philippines, being handed out through organizations like Medical Teams International, Relief International, Forward Edge International, and by the Red Cross. Recently Puralytics won the International Water Association’s Global Honour Award for long term use of the SolarBag in rural villages in Africa. For more information on the SolarBag, see the company’s website – www.puralytics.com

 

References

(2013). Activity Report 2012. Geneva: The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre.

Gutierrez, D. (2008). Natural Disasters Up More Than 400 Percent in Two Decades. Natural News.

Jennifer Blanke, e. a. (2014). Global Risk 2014, Ninth Edition. World Economic Forum.

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Water Innovation Award

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July 27  |  Editorial, Latest News, News, Newsletters, Press Release, Trade Shows  |   Webmaster

LG Sound has been honoured with the WTP Water Innovation Award in Brussels.

Water Innovation Europe

Click the links below to view the web pages …

LG Sound receives WTP Water Innovation Award with new MPC-Buoy

wsstp award 620x413 LG Sound receives WssTP Water Innovation Award with new MPC Buoy

http://www.waterinnovationeurope.eu/

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Water – “Nature’s Medicine”

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November 3  |  Editorial, Latest News, Nutrition, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

Safe drinking water is essential to humans and other lifeforms even though it provides no calories or organic nutrients.

80% of all illness in the developing world comes from waterborne diseases.

So, the most valuable medicine we could provide is a simple, clean glass of water.

Our SolarBag can help. It offers individuals and households anywhere in the world, the world’s best detoxification and disinfection solution for pennies a day.

Access to safe drinking water has improved over the last decades in almost every part of the world, but approximately one billion people still lack access to safe water and over 2.5 billion lack access to adequate sanitation.[1]

Imprtance of Water

There is a clear correlation between access to safe water and GDP per capita.[2] However, some observers have estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability.[3] A report, issued in November 2009, suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%.[4]   Approximately 70% of the fresh water used by humans goes to agriculture.[5]

References:
  1. “MDG Report 2008”. Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  2. “Public Services”, Gapminder video
  3. Kulshreshtha, S.N (1998). “A Global Outlook for Water Resources to the Year 2025”. Water Resources Management 12 (3): 167–184. doi:10.1023/A:1007957229865.
  4. “Charting Our Water Future: Economic frameworks to inform decision-making” (PDF). Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  5. Baroni, L.; Cenci, L.; Tettamanti, M.; Berati, M. (2007). “Evaluating the environmental impact of various dietary patterns combined with different food production systems”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 61 (2): 279–286. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602522. PMID 17035955.

 

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