Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On LinkedinVisit Us On Youtube

Opinion

Beat the Heat

Comments Off on Beat the Heat
July 19  |  Emergency Preparedness, News, Newsletters, Opinion, Research  |   Webmaster

Web MD, a trusted source for professional medical information, has provided a timely special report on the importance of water during hot temperatures and other important health tips and resources to stay safe during hot summer days.

slide image

Web MD has a dedicated team of board-certified physicians, award-winning journalists, and trained community moderators, all solely dedicated to providing accurate, timely, daily information about a wide range of personal health care concerns.  They are committed to helping people find the health and medical information, support, and services they need.

Please click on the links below for more information and feel free to subscribe to their electronic newsletter.

Take the Quiz:  How much do you know about Hydration?

Symptoms of Dehydration

Heat Stroke – Symptoms & Treatment

Sign up for Web MD newsletters and information

 

 

Tagged , , , ,

World Water Day 2015

Comments Off on World Water Day 2015
March 22  |  climate change, Editorial, global warming, News, Nutrition, Opinion, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

World Water Day 2015

World Water Day logo

This year’s theme is Water and Sustainable Development

Visit http://www.unwater.org/worldwaterday/ for more details.

What does WATER mean to you?  Search #wateris and #WorldWaterDay

 

We spill it, drink it, bathe in it, cook with it, flush it, run it down the drain and the gutter, drench the lawn and wash the car with it.

While we waste perfectly good water and don’t give a second thought, the following statistics should be a sober wake-up call to all of us to be more respectful and conserving of this valuable resource.  Water is truly the lifeblood of our precious earth.

  • An astounding 1,400 children die every day from diseases linked to unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation.
  • Roughly 75% of all industrial water withdrawals are used for energy production.
  • There are 658 million people living without access to water in Africa.
  • By 2035, the global energy demand is projected to grow by more than one-third.
  • Diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water, sanitation and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally, which is 2,300 people per day.
  • 750 million people lack access to clean water, which is over double the population of the United States.
  • 82% of those who lack access to improved water live in rural areas.

The water crisis is the number one global risk based on impact to society (as a measure of devastation) and the eighth global risk based on likelihood (likelihood of occurring within ten years), according to the World Economic Forum.

The UN says the planet is facing a 40% shortfall in water supply by 2030, unless the world dramatically improves the management of this precious resource.

This is the conclusion reached in the 2015 United Nations World Water Development Report, “Water for a Sustainable World” launched in New Delhi ahead of World Water Day on 22 March.

The theme of 2015 it’s about how water links to all areas we need to consider to create the future we want.

water in hands

Join the 2015 campaign to raise awareness of water and sanitation. You can also contribute on social media though the hashtags #WaterIs and #WorldWaterDay.

World Water Day is marked on 22 March every year. It’s a day to celebrate water. It’s a day to make a difference for the members of the global population who suffer from water related issues. It’s a day to prepare for how we manage water in the future.

In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March as the first World Water Day. 22 years later, World Water Day is celebrated around the world every year, shining the spotlight on a different issue.

We invite you to do your own research and see how you can make a difference.  Following is a link to  a short video by the UN to get you started …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1Zwd4B_Zqw

 

 

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Health Canada restricts antibiotics

Comments Off on Health Canada restricts antibiotics
July 13  |  antibiotics, Beef, Editorial, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Opinion, Pork, Poultry, Press Release, Research  |   Webmaster

Health Canada restricts use of antibiotics for growth in livestock

In an effort to curb drug-resistant superbugs, Health Canada is restricting the use of antibiotics in livestock.

Producers will no longer be allowed to continuously feed animals low-level doses as a way to promote growth.

Dr. Trisha Dowling, a pharmacologist with the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, says penicillin and tetracycline have long been fed to livestock in order to reduce the workload of animals’ immune systems, thereby causing them to grow faster using less feed.

She says in many cases, products specifically marketed as growth-promotants are older drugs that have fallen out of use in humans as bacteria have developed resistance.

The rules do still allow in-feed antibiotics as a preventative measure against disease.

Dowling says that in many cases, the exception means business-as-usual for producers.

She says this was especially true in the poultry industry, where improved growth is essentially a side benefit for producers using the drugs to prevent infections that can wipe out whole barns if they get a foothold.

“If you don’t put (antibiotics) in the feed, and you wait until you get an outbreak of necrotic enteritis, you’ve got a lot of dead birds and you’ve lost a lot of money,” she said.

On the cattle side, Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association CEO Craig Douglas said most producers don’t feed antibiotics.

“Without singling out any other industry — it’s other sectors where that’s been more of a standard procedure,” he said.

Douglas said most ranchers only reach for the antibiotics when an animal is clearly unwell.

“They’re not medicating their animals unless their sick,” he said, adding that costs as high as $500 per animal tends to keep the use of injected antibiotics in check.

~ The Canadian Press – Friday, July 11, 2014

 

Tagged , , , ,

A Tribute to Dairy Farmers

Comments Off on A Tribute to Dairy Farmers
April 23  |  Dairy, Editorial, Farm, Farmers, Opinion  |   Webmaster

This page is dedicated to Dairy Farmers as a tribute and acknowledgement for their hard work, dedication, and care.  We admire and respect all farm operators, especially family operations which take pride in providing us all with safe, nutritional food.

While Puroxi Pure Water Global has expanded its reach with new products, systems, throughout international markets, we will always have a special fondness for farm operators, particularly dairy farmers.  This hardy savvy group was the first to see the benefits of our product and appreciate the results.

Dairy farmers work hard every day to bring you and your family fresh, great tasting, wholesome milk products.  Almost all dairies are family-owned, and as active members of their communities, farm families take pride in feeding our country and maintaining natural resources.  That means preserving the land where they live and work, protecting the air and water they share with neighbors, and providing the best care for their cows—the lifeblood of their business.

Read more at www.dairyfarming.org

dairy farmer

Some Dairy Facts:

• Average number of cows in milking herd: 70

• Canada has 12,529 dairy farms with almost 1 million cows

• Canadian dairy farmers sell an average of 7.31 billion litres of milk annually to processors

• Three main processors process approximately 80% of the milk produced in Canada

• There are approximately 450 milk processors in Canada

• 700 kinds of cheese are made in Canada

• Sales of milk and dairy products contribute $10 billion to the Canadian economy

• Ontario’s milk production in 2012 was 2.6 billion litres of milk

• The farm gate value of milk from Ontario’s dairy farms is about $1.9 billion annually and  accounts for about 19 per cent of the province’s agricultural production

• Licensed dairy farms in Ontario as of December 2012: 4,100

• Average age of Canadian dairy farmers: 47

• Number of dairy cows in Ontario in 2012: 315,000 milking cows plus 173,000 heifers over one year old.

~ Facts courtesy of Dairy Farmers of Ontario

Read more about dairy families here:

http://www.prairiefarms.com/about-families-helping-families.aspx 

Following are some other links to information, fact sheets, videos and more, to help you understand a dairy farmer’s life & perspective …

Watch the real life stories of the dairy farmers behind 100% Canadian milk

Life on the Farm

Dairy Farmers of Canada

So God Made a Dairy Farmer

Dairy Farmers of Canada

Ask a Dairy Farmer

Myths vs. Facts

Dairy Nutrition Facts

2014 Milk Calendar 


Farmers’ Voice is a blog that gives Canadian dairy farmers a place to share their stories and talk about life on a dairy farm, in their own words. Written by dairy farmers who provide milk that is among the best in the world, Farmers’ Voice offers an insider perspective on subjects that matter to farmers.  See http://www.dairyfarmers.ca/farmers-voice/

 

 

 

Tagged , , ,

Climate Change | Water Shortage | Agriculture

Comments Off on Climate Change | Water Shortage | Agriculture
December 29  |  climate change, crops, Editorial, Farm, global warming, Nutrition, Opinion, Research, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

While the pundits and partisan experts continue to argue over the validity of global warming, there is little doubt that climate change is a reality.  The rapidly increasing changes in our climate are impacting our water supply.

Scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have calculated how much of this essential resource the world risks losing to the effects of climate change.  Droughts will become more widespread and wildfires are expected to get bigger, longer and smokier by 2050. The growing world population and its increase in water consumption are also straining fresh water resources.  Water sources are melting and drying out.   

37 nations already make do with the bare minimum in water resources, according to experts at the World Resources Institute (WRI), a co-author of the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas.  Massive investments in efficient water management are necessary to counter the effects of water scarcity.

 Agriculture is the world’s largest consumer of water

In times of rising food prices, the agricultural sector has become more interesting for investors. Asian companies, particularly in China, as well as their European counterparts are buying up large swaths of land in Africa to grow food products. They, too, have a vested interest in good harvests and are keen on investment in any aspect of agriculture that offers a significant opportunity to reduce its demand for water. However, technical solutions to save water in agriculture will play only a small role due to the high costs.

Changes in the world’s agriculture and eating habits need to be re-examined

Hunger follows on the heels of water scarcity

Agriculture must change in order to counter dwindling water resources. Climate researchers warn of an increased risk of hunger, in particular in poorer countries, with farmers trying to adapt to cycles of recurring drought and extreme, torrential rains.  One way to counter these extremes is through organic farming, which strengthens the capacity of the soil to absorb water, to enrich it and later deliver it again to the plants.

Organic farming could also limit the spread of diseases and pests without farmers having to resort to pesticides.  Crop rotation and diversity would make it more difficult for diseases and crop destroyers to infest cultivated areas.  This was common practice for many generations before industrial farming began.

In addition, consumers will have to alter their habits in ways that include eating less meat and seeking out crops more attuned to local conditions.  In dry regions of the world, farmers could plant the cereal crop millet, which needs significantly less water than corn.

Another climate-friendly measure: growers and consumers should be located closer to one another to decrease theamount of shipments and transports.

Such changes would help feed a constantly growing global population.  Even today, the world produces enough food for 14 billion people.

We don’t need to produce more foodwhat we need is better quality and more diversity.

 

Source:  http://www.dw.de/climate-change-fuels-water-scarcity-and-hunger/a-17325128

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Global Warming

Comments Off on Global Warming
September 29  |  climate change, Editorial, global warming, Latest News, Opinion, Research  |   Webmaster

The Global Warming debated has heated up again, following the recent release of a report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

On one side, the climate change deniers emphasize the fact that global warming has remained relatively stable for the past 17 years.  They maintain that this supports the “Hockey Stick” conclusion that global warming has actually leveled off and therefore not expected to increase in the foreseeable future. 

On the other side, the IPCC continues to insist that climate change is real, is caused by human activity, and continues despite regional differences, over a time line of 1400 years.  Furthermore, it maintains that we will see far more dangerous and potentially irreversible impacts in the decades ahead, if we do not choose to reduce global carbon emissions. There has never been a greater urgency to act than there is now.

Which side is right?  Well, maybe they both are, in their own way.  As with most heated / controversial topics,  everyone has their own strong opinion and many will strive mightily to affirm their agenda.  As their almost religious fervor develops, there will  undoubtedly be misdirection, cherry-picking, half-truths, outright falsehoods, and even personal verbal attacks.  At the heart of this controversy is the credibility of the IPCC position and agenda, as well as their format for accepted, qualified peer reviews.

Nevertheless, no one can dispute the facts that polar ice caps are melting and that the world’s oceans are getting warmer, thus setting up even more change for climate patterns around the world.

We urge you all to do your own independent research and make your own informed conclusions.  We have listed some recent links below, to get you started.

http://www.ipcc.ch/news_and_events/press_information.shtml#.Ukh8F3_NmNg

www.climatechange2013.org/images/uploads/WGIAR5-SPM_Approved27Sep2013.pdf

http://scienceblogs.com/significantfigures/index.php/2013/09/27/what-does-the-2013-ipcc-summary-say-about-water/

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/28/ipcc-climate-change-deniers

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2013/09/27/un-climate-change-report-dismisses-slowdown-in-global-warming/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2420783/computers-got-effects-greenhouse-gases-wrong.html

http://www.colby.edu/sts/controversy/pages/ipcc_controversy.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming_controversy

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-27/global-warming-s-slower-pace-hardens-views-on-need-to-act.html

 

 

 

Tagged , , , , , ,

Ontario Flooding

Comments Off on Ontario Flooding
May 5  |  Editorial, Latest News, Opinion, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

Parts of the Assiniboine River, seen here in 2011, are experiencing higher-than-normal levels.

While the debate continues about global warming, many parts of central and northern Ontario are experiencing some of the worst flooding since 1985.  Regardless of the root cause, the sudden increase of summer-like temperatures across the province has brought a rush of snow melt, sparking flood alerts from Bracebridge and Muskoka to Sudbury, Timins and the James Bay area.  Evacuation orders and a state of emergency have been declared in many communities, especially First Nations Communities.  Similar situations also exist in parts of Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Failing water treatment plants, water run-off, sewer back-ups, and well water contamination have contributed to a drinking water crisis.  In emergency situations like this, people need access to safe, clean drinking water for their family, pets, and animals.

Our SolarBag is the ideal solution for this situations like this and we hope that people, agencies, and government take advantage of this eco-friendly, chemical-free, and easy to use product. Our thoughts, best wishes & prayers are with all of those affected.

.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Safe Drinking Water Pledge

Comments Off on Safe Drinking Water Pledge
April 20  |  Editorial, Latest News, Opinion, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

SIGN THE PLEDGE!

 

Thank you to everyone (over 550 people!) who has signed the pledge to state that they agree that high quality water should be available to all Canadians. Please visit www.safewater.org and sign the pledge (it takes less than one minute).

With 1,109 Boil Water Advisories and 47 Do Not Drink Orders in Canada at this time it is important for everyone’s voice to be heard concerning this important issue.

This is your last chance to sign your name on the pledge as it will only be on the Safe Drinking Water Foundation website until Monday, April 22nd (Earth Day)!

Please visit our website for more information about SDWF and Earth Day …

www.puroxi.com

 

Tagged , , , ,

Water Critical Issue for Farmers`

Comments Off on Water Critical Issue for Farmers`
March 10  |  Case Studies, Editorial, Farm, Latest News, Opinion  |   Webmaster

This is a very timely and telling story for Canadians.  It’s shocking to think that Canada, a country with more water than almost any other country on the planet, has to worry about water supply. This seemingly inexhaustable supply has always been taken for granted and thus encouraged us to be wasteful and inefficient with our use of water. That can’t continue.

A panel of experts has reported that water is becoming a critical issue for Canadian farmers and better water management needs to start now.

The comprehensive 284-page report, Water and Agriculture in Canada: Towards Sustainable Management of Water Resources is from the Council of Canadian Academies, an independent, nonprofit organization that prepares science-based studies to inform public policy.

The panel identified critical areas, such as risks to water supply, monitoring of water quality and quantity, land management, new farming technologies and governance of water resources.

See the full story by Bob McDonald, science editor for CBC, please click here  …

.

Tagged , ,

Thank God for Farmers

Comments Off on Thank God for Farmers
February 17  |  crops, Editorial, Farm, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Opinion  |   Webmaster

The whole world was buzzing with tweets, emails, facebook comments, and all sorts of social media shortly after the airing of the now famous “So God Made a Farmer” commercial during the Super Bowl football game.  It struck a chord in most people and for a brief moment in time, seemed to transcend the differences between country-folk and city-folk.  It served as a reminder for all of us to pay tribute to that small group of dedicated individuals and families, scattered throughout the land, who help feed and nourish us.   Farming and ranching has a long history and is a cornerstone in our success as a civilization.  Yes, indeed, thank God for farmers.

Farmers Feed Cities

Thank a Farmer

 

 

 

The words in the video are from the speech that Mr. Paul Harvey gave to the 1978 National FFA Convention.   Here is the transcript to this wonderful and inspiring speech:  

So God Made a Farmer

And on the eighth day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, “I need a caretaker.” So God made a farmer.

God said, “I need somebody willing to get up before dawn, milk cows, work all day in the field, milk cows again, eat supper, then go to town and stay past midnight at a meeting of the township board.” So God made a farmer.

“I need somebody with arms strong enough to wrestle a calf and yet gentle enough to cradle his own grandchild. Somebody to call hogs, tame cantankerous machinery, come home hungry, have to wait for lunch until his wife’s done feeding visiting ladies, then tell the ladies to be sure to come back real soon and mean it.” So God made a farmer.

God said, “I need somebody willing to sit up all night with a newborn colt and watch it die, then dry his eyes and say, ‘Maybe next year,’ I need somebody who can shape an ax handle from an ash tree, shoe a horse, who can fix a harness with hay wire, feed sacks and shoe scraps. Who, during planting time and harvest season will finish his 40-hour week by Tuesday noon and then, paining from tractor back, will put in another 72 hours.” So God made a farmer.

God had to have somebody willing to ride the ruts at double speed to get the hay in ahead of the rain clouds and yet stop in mid-field and race to help when he sees the first smoke from a neighbor’s place. So God made a farmer.

God said, “I need somebody strong enough to clear trees and heave bales, yet gentle enough to help a newborn calf begin to suckle and tend the pink-comb pullets, who will stop his mower in an instant to avoid the nest of meadowlarks.”

It had to be somebody who’d plow deep and straight and not cut corners. Somebody to seed, weed, feed, breed, rake, disk, plow, plant, strain the milk, replenish the self-feeder and finish a hard week’s work with an eight mile drive to church. Somebody who’d bale a family together with the soft, strong bonds of sharing, who would laugh, and then sigh and then reply with smiling eyes when his his son says he want to spend his life doing what dad does- “So God made a farmer.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Following are the links for the Dodge Ram ad, the original YouTube video, and other informative sites:

http://www.youtube.com/ram

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuzhwkaNC40

http://www.farms.com/FarmsPages/ChatDeshBoard/ChatThreadView/tabid/146/Default.aspx?chatid=112671

http://www.puroxi.com/archives/5653

I love farmers

 

 

 

 

.

Scroll Up
error: Sorry, right click copy feature has been disabled.