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Nutrition

Turkey Farm testimonial

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January 22  |  Case Studies, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Nutrition, Poultry, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster
Improved Water Quality:

The main reason I was interested in trying out Puroxi (Oxy Blast) was due to the poor water quality at Pine Park Farms. Each barn at the farm has its own separate well with different mineral levels but what they all have in common is a high level of manganese.

Before switching to Puroxi (OB), I was using chlorine as the daily water sanitation product for my turkey farm. The interaction between the chlorine and the manganese produced a thick black slime/sludge that would coat all of the waterlines and pug them up over time. To try to clear up the water going into the barn, I had tried a variety of different water filtration systems from a few different water filtration companies. None of them seemed to be able to keep up and would plug up over time.

Cleaner Plumbing:

The switch from chlorine to Puroxi (Oxy Blast) has eliminated this problem.

The Puroxi (OB) does not react with the manganese and has actually over time removed all off the black slime and sludge throughout all of my waterlines. The waterlines are now cleaner than they have ever been.

Disinfectant:

The Puroxi (OB) also seems to work extremely effectively as a daily disinfectant. I am able to achieve the same level of Puroxi (OB) from the start of my waterlines to the end of the waterlines. This is quite a feat as one of the barns is over 600 ft long. The litter conditions in the barns have improved and the litter is not as wet as with the chlorinated water.

Another big improvement has been in the feed conversion for turkey Toms. Where I previously achieved an average of 2.4 feed conversion in 16wk/16.5kg toms, I have now averaged an 2.25 feed conversion for 16wk/16.5kg toms.

I am going to attach a few photos so you can see the improvements of one of the cistern tanks and a small filter to show how the Puroxi (Oxy Blast) has cleared up my water lines. You are welcome to use these in the article if you want.

LEFT – This is what a small simple filter looked like with the chlorine treatment. The water flowing through this small filter was filtered first by large iron eating filters.

RIGHT – This photo is the exact same filter, after using the Puroxi (OB)

The following are above-view photos from one of my cistern tanks –

Before the start of using the Puroxi (OB);

1 week later after the use of Puroxi (OB). The brown/black residue has been coming off the sides and settling on the bottom of the tank;

Less than 4 weeks after starting Puroxi (OB). What a remarkable & welcome difference!

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Water for Livestock

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January 20  |  antibiotics, Beef, Business Opportunity, Case Studies, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water, testimonials  |   Webmaster

Providing enough quality water is essential for good livestock husbandry.

Water makes up 80% of the blood, regulates body temperature and is vital for organ functions such as digestion, waste removal, the absorption of nutrients (feed conversion), lactation, and much more. Understanding daily livestock watering needs is key when designing a livestock watering system.

The daily water requirement of livestock varies significantly depending on animal species, size and growth stage. Environmental aspects as well as the QUALITY of water, also impact the amount of water intake. PUROXI improves the quality of your water and delivery systems ensuring your livestock will drink the recommended amount.

Click on the links below for additional information, facts, and articles of interest. You can also use the Search function tool (top right corner) to find items of interest.

Water Requirements for Livestock

Advantages of PUROXI Water Treatment

Product brochures for various species

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Water for Beef Cattle

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January 20  |  Beef, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

Adequate clean fresh water is the cornerstone to animal husbandry.

Cows (& calves) need plenty of quality drinking water, especially during the hot summer months. Water consumption increases proportionately as ambient temperature increases above 40 F degrees. Also, lactation increases the amount of water required by beef cows.

An adequate source of fresh, clean, good-tasting water will ensure that the cows drink as much water as they need, resulting in good feed conversion and lactation.

For detailed information from various qualified sources, please click on the links below. You can also use our Search box feature at the top right corner of the page, to access many other studies, reports, and articles of interest.

Water for Beef Cattle

Organic Cow-Calf Testimonial

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Water for Dairy

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January 20  |  Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Research, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

The importance of water quality and intake for dairy farms cannot be over-stated and is worth repeating.

Water is one of the most important, yet often neglected, nutrients for the cow. Water ranks second, only to oxygen, in importance to the cow.

Lack of water will reduce dry matter (feed) intake and production. Also, water quality will impact water intake, and cows are more sensitive than people to poor water quality.

For more detailed information from government and academia sources, please click on the links below. Also, feel free to use our Search box function (top right corner) to find additional material and articles of interest.

Water Quality and Intake for Dairy

Water Quality for Cattle

Water Quality for Dairy Cattle

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Importance of Water-Dairy Calves

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July 23  |  Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, News, Nutrition  |   Webmaster

Following is an excellent and timely article from Progressive Dairyman magazine re: the importance of water for dairy.

The award-winning magazine’s editors and contributors provide compelling features, helpful articles, insightful news analysis, and entertaining commentary about the people, practices and topics related to a dairy lifestyle.

Why high-quality water matters for calf success

Contributed by Ellan Dufour Published on 30 May 2018

Often overlooked, water is the most important nutrient for dairy calves. It is required for all of life’s processes including the transport, digestion and metabolism of nutrients, the elimination of waste materials and excess heat from the body, and the maintenance of a proper fluid-ion balance in the body.

The role of water in young calves

Offering calves free-choice water is critical for stimulating rumen development, improving grain fermentation and promoting starter intake. The quality of water offered can play a major role in calf health and nutrient utilization.

Rumen development: Unlike milk and milk replacer, water consumed by young calves is transported to the rumen rather than the abomasum. Water in the rumen provides a medium for ruminal bacteria to ferment starter feed, grain and hay. Rumen development is slowed in the absence of water.

Improved growth: Calves offered free-choice water in addition to their liquid diet are shown to gain weight faster and consume dry feed quicker than calves only receiving water through their milk or milk replacer.

Calf health: Calves are about 70 to 75 percent water by bodyweight and need to consume fresh water in order to maintain normal cellular functions. Dehydration can lead to weakness, severe weight loss and even death. Signs of dehydration include sunken eyes, dry mouth and nose, tacky gums, depressed demeanor, irregular pulse and cold legs and ears.

How much and when?

  • Pre-weaning: On average, calves consume 1 quart of water per pound of dry matter intake.
  • Post-weaning: Calves should consume 2 quarts of water per pound of dry matter intake. This ratio should extend through the heifer growing period.
  • Hot weather: Expect water consumption to increase by 33 percent or more as temperatures reach the high 70s, and anticipate it may double as temperatures pass 90ºF.

Factors affecting water quality

Offering poor-quality water to the young calf may impact water consumption and starter intake, calf health, rumen development and the value of milk replacer and electrolytes. There are many criteria involved in assessing water quality. These include organoleptic properties (odor and taste), physiochemical properties (pH, total dissolved solids [TDS], total soluble salts and hardness), presence of toxic compounds, presence of excess minerals or compounds (see Table 1), and presence of bacteria.

Hardness: Calves are very sensitive to sodium and struggle to tolerate excess sodium levels. Soft water or hard water that has passed through a water softener can have very high concentrations of sodium and should not be used to mix milk replacer or be offered as drinking water unless tested. High sodium levels can lead to neurological diseases and central nervous system derangement in young calves.

Osmolarity: In situations where total solids are high in milk or milk replacer (over 15 percent), offering high-quality water can sustain the osmotic equilibrium in a calf. High total solids can force water out of cells in an effort to find osmotic balance within the gut and can result in diarrhea and severe dehydration. Water provision is especially important for calves fed an accelerated milk replacer program to ensure proper hydration.

Bacteria: Coliform bacteria like E. Coli and salmonella may be present in poor-quality water or water contaminated by feces and can quickly and exponentially increase to dangerous levels in a calf if consumed. In both cases, calves may suffer from severe dehydration and diarrhea. Salmonella may also result in pneumonia and septicemia in infected animals. Water with high iron content is at an increased risk of salmonella contamination.

Minerals: Calves are more sensitive to elevated mineral levels than adult cattle, making excessive mineral concentrations in drinking water a particular concern. Upper concentrations and maximum tolerable concentrations of minerals for dairy cattle are shown in Table 1 (below).  Minerals of particular concern when in high concentrations include cobalt, copper, iron, hydrogen sulfide, manganese and sulfur.

Take-home messages

  • Ensure calves are consistently provided with clean, fresh, and readily available water.
  • Keep water buckets clean and free of contamination from starter feed and feces.
  • Know the least expensive and most efficient method available to modify mineral and microbial concentration of water offered to calves.
  • Check your water quality frequently. At minimum, water fed to calves should be tested annually.

 

Ellan Dufour is a dairy research nutritionist with Hubbard Feeds.Source: https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/calves-heifers/why-high-quality-water-matters-for-calf-success

To download a pdf version of this article, please click here

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Video

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June 25  |  crops, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

We invite you to view our short 3 minute presentation to introduce you to Puroxi Pure Water Global Inc. ~ an international company recognized as a leader in Water Treatment for farms, crops, residential, municipal, commercial applications.

 

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FDA voluntary guidelines to restrict non-therapeutic use of antibiotics

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July 13  |  antibiotics, Beef, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, Research  |   Webmaster

In December, the FDA asked animal health companies to voluntarily stop using antibiotics to promote growth of meatier cows, pigs, and other livestock.  This is known as non-therapeutic use.

According to a recent report by the FDA, 25 sponsors confirmed in writing their intent to engage with FDA as defined in Guidance #213 and have given FDA consent to list their names in this update.  These 25 sponsors hold 99.6 percent of the applications affected by Guidance #213 and include subsidiaries of Bayer and Eli-Lilly.

Click here for a complete list of companies represented.

The guidelines are meant to thwart the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, which some scientists blame on antibiotics in the food supply. Drug-resistant bacteria strike 2 million Americans a year and cause 23,000 deaths, according to the CDC. The FDA has long been under fire for failing to keep a lid on antibiotic use in farm animals. In January, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) released a report containing evidence that the FDA’s scientists were aware of 18 farm antibiotics that posed a high risk of spawning antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 

However, critics claim that 89 percent of antibiotic drugs that the guidelines advise against using to speed growth can still be given to healthy animals for other reasons, such as disease prevention. They also contend that since the system is voluntary, it gives the pharamaceutical companies too much discretion and leeway in conducting their own policy and enforcement methods, especially on large factory farms, and with easily obtained OTC (over the counter) drugs.  Critics are demanding a complete ban on antibiotics/ antimicrobials for non-therapeutic use.

Following is a link to a recent Reuters News article which offers a well-balanced summary of this story.

Reuters U.S. Edition – March 27, 2014.
 

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Climate Change | Water Shortage | Agriculture

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December 29  |  climate change, crops, Editorial, Farm, global warming, Nutrition, Opinion, Research, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

While the pundits and partisan experts continue to argue over the validity of global warming, there is little doubt that climate change is a reality.  The rapidly increasing changes in our climate are impacting our water supply.

Scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have calculated how much of this essential resource the world risks losing to the effects of climate change.  Droughts will become more widespread and wildfires are expected to get bigger, longer and smokier by 2050. The growing world population and its increase in water consumption are also straining fresh water resources.  Water sources are melting and drying out.   

37 nations already make do with the bare minimum in water resources, according to experts at the World Resources Institute (WRI), a co-author of the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas.  Massive investments in efficient water management are necessary to counter the effects of water scarcity.

 Agriculture is the world’s largest consumer of water

In times of rising food prices, the agricultural sector has become more interesting for investors. Asian companies, particularly in China, as well as their European counterparts are buying up large swaths of land in Africa to grow food products. They, too, have a vested interest in good harvests and are keen on investment in any aspect of agriculture that offers a significant opportunity to reduce its demand for water. However, technical solutions to save water in agriculture will play only a small role due to the high costs.

Changes in the world’s agriculture and eating habits need to be re-examined

Hunger follows on the heels of water scarcity

Agriculture must change in order to counter dwindling water resources. Climate researchers warn of an increased risk of hunger, in particular in poorer countries, with farmers trying to adapt to cycles of recurring drought and extreme, torrential rains.  One way to counter these extremes is through organic farming, which strengthens the capacity of the soil to absorb water, to enrich it and later deliver it again to the plants.

Organic farming could also limit the spread of diseases and pests without farmers having to resort to pesticides.  Crop rotation and diversity would make it more difficult for diseases and crop destroyers to infest cultivated areas.  This was common practice for many generations before industrial farming began.

In addition, consumers will have to alter their habits in ways that include eating less meat and seeking out crops more attuned to local conditions.  In dry regions of the world, farmers could plant the cereal crop millet, which needs significantly less water than corn.

Another climate-friendly measure: growers and consumers should be located closer to one another to decrease theamount of shipments and transports.

Such changes would help feed a constantly growing global population.  Even today, the world produces enough food for 14 billion people.

We don’t need to produce more foodwhat we need is better quality and more diversity.

 

Source:  http://www.dw.de/climate-change-fuels-water-scarcity-and-hunger/a-17325128

 

 

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Water – “Nature’s Medicine”

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November 3  |  Editorial, Latest News, Nutrition, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

Safe drinking water is essential to humans and other lifeforms even though it provides no calories or organic nutrients.

80% of all illness in the developing world comes from waterborne diseases.

So, the most valuable medicine we could provide is a simple, clean glass of water.

Our SolarBag can help. It offers individuals and households anywhere in the world, the world’s best detoxification and disinfection solution for pennies a day.

Access to safe drinking water has improved over the last decades in almost every part of the world, but approximately one billion people still lack access to safe water and over 2.5 billion lack access to adequate sanitation.[1]

Imprtance of Water

There is a clear correlation between access to safe water and GDP per capita.[2] However, some observers have estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability.[3] A report, issued in November 2009, suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%.[4]   Approximately 70% of the fresh water used by humans goes to agriculture.[5]

References:
  1. “MDG Report 2008”. Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  2. “Public Services”, Gapminder video
  3. Kulshreshtha, S.N (1998). “A Global Outlook for Water Resources to the Year 2025”. Water Resources Management 12 (3): 167–184. doi:10.1023/A:1007957229865.
  4. “Charting Our Water Future: Economic frameworks to inform decision-making” (PDF). Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  5. Baroni, L.; Cenci, L.; Tettamanti, M.; Berati, M. (2007). “Evaluating the environmental impact of various dietary patterns combined with different food production systems”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 61 (2): 279–286. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602522. PMID 17035955.

 

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TAPPED – The Truth about the Bottled Water industry

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August 19  |  Case Studies, Editorial, Latest News, Nutrition, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

Tapped – The Truth about the Bottled Water Industry

 

Is access to clean drinking water a basic human right, or a commodity that should be bought and sold like any other article of commerce?

I am sure that you have heard or read about the ills of the bottled water industry. From the BPA in the bottles to the mass amounts of plastic waste covering our earth and entering our water ways.

It is time we get all the facts and you will be amazed at how deep this problem really is.

“Tapped” is a Documentary film about the Bottled Water Industry.

In the film “Tapped” you will be educated on bottle water and all of it’s faults. It examines the role of the bottled water industry and its effects on our health, climate change, pollution, and our reliance on oil.

“Tapped” is an amazing documentary that presents an overwhelming amount of evidence which will change the way anyone thinks about bottled and municipal water.

tapped-poster

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From the producers of Who Killed the Electric Car? and I.O.U.S.A., Tapped takes a behind-the-scenes look into the unregulated and unseen world of the bottled water industry — an industry that aims to privatize and sell back the one resource that ought never to become a commodity: our water.

From the plastic production to the ocean in which so many of these bottles end up, this inspiring documentary trails the path of the bottled water industry and the communities which were the unwitting chips on the table. A powerful portrait of the lives affected by the bottled water industry, this revelatory film features those caught at the intersection of big business and the public’s right to water.

“Tapped” immediately breaks down the false notions surrounding the so called “benefits” of bottled water. It points out that 40% of bottled water is merely filtered municipal water – looking at you, Dasani and Aquafina. They also point out numerous times that it’s no safer than municipal water because the bottled water industry is largely unregulated whereas municipalities are held to strict testing under the EPA. But that’s just the tip of the bottled water-berg. Nearly the first half of the film documents the plight of a Maine town in which Nestle has moved in and taken over use of the city’s groundwater. This water source is governed differently than ponds, springs, rivers, etc. Essentially, whoever has the abilities to pump the most water, gets the most water. Nestle accesses the water for free, then bottles it and sells it for a profit. This leaves townsfolk unhappy as their own municipal water supply dwindles and must be transferred to another water well, resulting in service interruption which doesn’t seem to affect Nestle’s operation in the slightest. Water companies operate like this all over the country – moving into rural areas to perform “water mining,” wherein they extract water that is free and then sell it for billions of dollars.

I am from Maine and know this to be true. Nestle purchased Poland Spring Water. Poland Spring water was once actually drawn from a spring in Poland Maine, not any more. Many rural towns in Maine are being affected by the “water mining” referred to in the film.

If you have not seen “Tapped” it is time that you do.

Watch “Tapped” now!

http://vimeo.com/user7206487/tappedthemovie

 If this does not make you re-think your use of bottled water, nothing will!

Remember, before bottled water we found ways to get our thirst quenched. Watch an old Western movie or war movie and see your hero’s get a refreshing drink of water from a Canteen.

If your tap water gives you concerns, get yourself some type of water filtration system. Then find a re-useable water container that works best for you.

Just say “NO” to bottled water.

Hydrate responsibly!

GGATVnewlogo2Until next time…

follow me @thegogreenguy  @and be sure to like our facebook page

 

references for this post:

http://cinekatz.com/tapped-healthy-beverage-or-environmental-scourge/

http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/tapped/

http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/tap.html

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