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Livestock

Water for Livestock

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January 20  |  antibiotics, Beef, Business Opportunity, Case Studies, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water, testimonials  |   Webmaster

Providing enough quality water is essential for good livestock husbandry.

Water makes up 80% of the blood, regulates body temperature and is vital for organ functions such as digestion, waste removal, the absorption of nutrients (feed conversion), lactation, and much more. Understanding daily livestock watering needs is key when designing a livestock watering system.

The daily water requirement of livestock varies significantly depending on animal species, size and growth stage. Environmental aspects as well as the QUALITY of water, also impact the amount of water intake. PUROXI improves the quality of your water and delivery systems ensuring your livestock will drink the recommended amount.

Click on the links below for additional information, facts, and articles of interest. You can also use the Search function tool (top right corner) to find items of interest.

Water Requirements for Livestock

Advantages of PUROXI Water Treatment

Product brochures for various species

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Water for Beef Cattle

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January 20  |  Beef, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

Adequate clean fresh water is the cornerstone to animal husbandry.

Cows (& calves) need plenty of quality drinking water, especially during the hot summer months. Water consumption increases proportionately as ambient temperature increases above 40 F degrees. Also, lactation increases the amount of water required by beef cows.

An adequate source of fresh, clean, good-tasting water will ensure that the cows drink as much water as they need, resulting in good feed conversion and lactation.

For detailed information from various qualified sources, please click on the links below. You can also use our Search box feature at the top right corner of the page, to access many other studies, reports, and articles of interest.

Water for Beef Cattle

Organic Cow-Calf Testimonial

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Water for Dairy

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January 20  |  Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Research, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

The importance of water quality and intake for dairy farms cannot be over-stated and is worth repeating.

Water is one of the most important, yet often neglected, nutrients for the cow. Water ranks second, only to oxygen, in importance to the cow.

Lack of water will reduce dry matter (feed) intake and production. Also, water quality will impact water intake, and cows are more sensitive than people to poor water quality.

For more detailed information from government and academia sources, please click on the links below. Also, feel free to use our Search box function (top right corner) to find additional material and articles of interest.

Water Quality and Intake for Dairy

Water Quality for Cattle

Water Quality for Dairy Cattle

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Importance of Water-Dairy Calves

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July 23  |  Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, News, Nutrition  |   Webmaster

Following is an excellent and timely article from Progressive Dairyman magazine re: the importance of water for dairy.

The award-winning magazine’s editors and contributors provide compelling features, helpful articles, insightful news analysis, and entertaining commentary about the people, practices and topics related to a dairy lifestyle.

Why high-quality water matters for calf success

Contributed by Ellan Dufour Published on 30 May 2018

Often overlooked, water is the most important nutrient for dairy calves. It is required for all of life’s processes including the transport, digestion and metabolism of nutrients, the elimination of waste materials and excess heat from the body, and the maintenance of a proper fluid-ion balance in the body.

The role of water in young calves

Offering calves free-choice water is critical for stimulating rumen development, improving grain fermentation and promoting starter intake. The quality of water offered can play a major role in calf health and nutrient utilization.

Rumen development: Unlike milk and milk replacer, water consumed by young calves is transported to the rumen rather than the abomasum. Water in the rumen provides a medium for ruminal bacteria to ferment starter feed, grain and hay. Rumen development is slowed in the absence of water.

Improved growth: Calves offered free-choice water in addition to their liquid diet are shown to gain weight faster and consume dry feed quicker than calves only receiving water through their milk or milk replacer.

Calf health: Calves are about 70 to 75 percent water by bodyweight and need to consume fresh water in order to maintain normal cellular functions. Dehydration can lead to weakness, severe weight loss and even death. Signs of dehydration include sunken eyes, dry mouth and nose, tacky gums, depressed demeanor, irregular pulse and cold legs and ears.

How much and when?

  • Pre-weaning: On average, calves consume 1 quart of water per pound of dry matter intake.
  • Post-weaning: Calves should consume 2 quarts of water per pound of dry matter intake. This ratio should extend through the heifer growing period.
  • Hot weather: Expect water consumption to increase by 33 percent or more as temperatures reach the high 70s, and anticipate it may double as temperatures pass 90ºF.

Factors affecting water quality

Offering poor-quality water to the young calf may impact water consumption and starter intake, calf health, rumen development and the value of milk replacer and electrolytes. There are many criteria involved in assessing water quality. These include organoleptic properties (odor and taste), physiochemical properties (pH, total dissolved solids [TDS], total soluble salts and hardness), presence of toxic compounds, presence of excess minerals or compounds (see Table 1), and presence of bacteria.

Hardness: Calves are very sensitive to sodium and struggle to tolerate excess sodium levels. Soft water or hard water that has passed through a water softener can have very high concentrations of sodium and should not be used to mix milk replacer or be offered as drinking water unless tested. High sodium levels can lead to neurological diseases and central nervous system derangement in young calves.

Osmolarity: In situations where total solids are high in milk or milk replacer (over 15 percent), offering high-quality water can sustain the osmotic equilibrium in a calf. High total solids can force water out of cells in an effort to find osmotic balance within the gut and can result in diarrhea and severe dehydration. Water provision is especially important for calves fed an accelerated milk replacer program to ensure proper hydration.

Bacteria: Coliform bacteria like E. Coli and salmonella may be present in poor-quality water or water contaminated by feces and can quickly and exponentially increase to dangerous levels in a calf if consumed. In both cases, calves may suffer from severe dehydration and diarrhea. Salmonella may also result in pneumonia and septicemia in infected animals. Water with high iron content is at an increased risk of salmonella contamination.

Minerals: Calves are more sensitive to elevated mineral levels than adult cattle, making excessive mineral concentrations in drinking water a particular concern. Upper concentrations and maximum tolerable concentrations of minerals for dairy cattle are shown in Table 1 (below).  Minerals of particular concern when in high concentrations include cobalt, copper, iron, hydrogen sulfide, manganese and sulfur.

Take-home messages

  • Ensure calves are consistently provided with clean, fresh, and readily available water.
  • Keep water buckets clean and free of contamination from starter feed and feces.
  • Know the least expensive and most efficient method available to modify mineral and microbial concentration of water offered to calves.
  • Check your water quality frequently. At minimum, water fed to calves should be tested annually.

 

Ellan Dufour is a dairy research nutritionist with Hubbard Feeds.Source: https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/calves-heifers/why-high-quality-water-matters-for-calf-success

To download a pdf version of this article, please click here

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Video

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June 25  |  crops, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

We invite you to view our short 3 minute presentation to introduce you to Puroxi Pure Water Global Inc. ~ an international company recognized as a leader in Water Treatment for farms, crops, residential, municipal, commercial applications.

 

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FDA voluntary guidelines to restrict non-therapeutic use of antibiotics

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July 13  |  antibiotics, Beef, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, Research  |   Webmaster

In December, the FDA asked animal health companies to voluntarily stop using antibiotics to promote growth of meatier cows, pigs, and other livestock.  This is known as non-therapeutic use.

According to a recent report by the FDA, 25 sponsors confirmed in writing their intent to engage with FDA as defined in Guidance #213 and have given FDA consent to list their names in this update.  These 25 sponsors hold 99.6 percent of the applications affected by Guidance #213 and include subsidiaries of Bayer and Eli-Lilly.

Click here for a complete list of companies represented.

The guidelines are meant to thwart the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, which some scientists blame on antibiotics in the food supply. Drug-resistant bacteria strike 2 million Americans a year and cause 23,000 deaths, according to the CDC. The FDA has long been under fire for failing to keep a lid on antibiotic use in farm animals. In January, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) released a report containing evidence that the FDA’s scientists were aware of 18 farm antibiotics that posed a high risk of spawning antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 

However, critics claim that 89 percent of antibiotic drugs that the guidelines advise against using to speed growth can still be given to healthy animals for other reasons, such as disease prevention. They also contend that since the system is voluntary, it gives the pharamaceutical companies too much discretion and leeway in conducting their own policy and enforcement methods, especially on large factory farms, and with easily obtained OTC (over the counter) drugs.  Critics are demanding a complete ban on antibiotics/ antimicrobials for non-therapeutic use.

Following is a link to a recent Reuters News article which offers a well-balanced summary of this story.

Reuters U.S. Edition – March 27, 2014.
 

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Thank God for Farmers

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February 17  |  crops, Editorial, Farm, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Opinion  |   Webmaster

The whole world was buzzing with tweets, emails, facebook comments, and all sorts of social media shortly after the airing of the now famous “So God Made a Farmer” commercial during the Super Bowl football game.  It struck a chord in most people and for a brief moment in time, seemed to transcend the differences between country-folk and city-folk.  It served as a reminder for all of us to pay tribute to that small group of dedicated individuals and families, scattered throughout the land, who help feed and nourish us.   Farming and ranching has a long history and is a cornerstone in our success as a civilization.  Yes, indeed, thank God for farmers.

Farmers Feed Cities

Thank a Farmer

 

 

 

The words in the video are from the speech that Mr. Paul Harvey gave to the 1978 National FFA Convention.   Here is the transcript to this wonderful and inspiring speech:  

So God Made a Farmer

And on the eighth day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, “I need a caretaker.” So God made a farmer.

God said, “I need somebody willing to get up before dawn, milk cows, work all day in the field, milk cows again, eat supper, then go to town and stay past midnight at a meeting of the township board.” So God made a farmer.

“I need somebody with arms strong enough to wrestle a calf and yet gentle enough to cradle his own grandchild. Somebody to call hogs, tame cantankerous machinery, come home hungry, have to wait for lunch until his wife’s done feeding visiting ladies, then tell the ladies to be sure to come back real soon and mean it.” So God made a farmer.

God said, “I need somebody willing to sit up all night with a newborn colt and watch it die, then dry his eyes and say, ‘Maybe next year,’ I need somebody who can shape an ax handle from an ash tree, shoe a horse, who can fix a harness with hay wire, feed sacks and shoe scraps. Who, during planting time and harvest season will finish his 40-hour week by Tuesday noon and then, paining from tractor back, will put in another 72 hours.” So God made a farmer.

God had to have somebody willing to ride the ruts at double speed to get the hay in ahead of the rain clouds and yet stop in mid-field and race to help when he sees the first smoke from a neighbor’s place. So God made a farmer.

God said, “I need somebody strong enough to clear trees and heave bales, yet gentle enough to help a newborn calf begin to suckle and tend the pink-comb pullets, who will stop his mower in an instant to avoid the nest of meadowlarks.”

It had to be somebody who’d plow deep and straight and not cut corners. Somebody to seed, weed, feed, breed, rake, disk, plow, plant, strain the milk, replenish the self-feeder and finish a hard week’s work with an eight mile drive to church. Somebody who’d bale a family together with the soft, strong bonds of sharing, who would laugh, and then sigh and then reply with smiling eyes when his his son says he want to spend his life doing what dad does- “So God made a farmer.”

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Following are the links for the Dodge Ram ad, the original YouTube video, and other informative sites:

http://www.youtube.com/ram

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuzhwkaNC40

http://www.farms.com/FarmsPages/ChatDeshBoard/ChatThreadView/tabid/146/Default.aspx?chatid=112671

http://www.puroxi.com/archives/5653

I love farmers

 

 

 

 

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Antibiotic Resistance in China

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February 16  |  antibiotics, Case Studies, Farm, food safety, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Pork, Research  |   Webmaster

More disturbing news from China. A news alert from Food Safety News reveals that manure from Chinese pig farms contains both antibiotic residues and high concentrations of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

The new study published Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences adds to the evidence that antibiotics used by China’s pork producers pose significant health risks. The study also found that once manure leaves the farm, its potential for spreading antibiotic resistance to other surrounding bacteria in the environment is much diminished, but not eliminated. Why should this concern us?  Because it is becoming a worldwide problem.  “We’re not trying to single out the Chinese here. This is a global problem,” said James Tiedje, a microbiologist from Michigan State University who joined the team of Chinese researchers for the project.

Pork production with antibiotic use has been growing rapidly in China, where half of world’s pigs are grown for a country with a growing appetite for pork. Demand for pork has increased in the orient, while it is steadily dropping in western countries, and almost non-existent in the middle and near east countries. For a variety of religious, cultural, and personal health reasons, a huge and growing segment of the world’s population abstains from pork and the mounting evidence seems to support their position.

Closer to home, a recent article by Dr. Mercola detailed surprising and disturbing results in a new investigation by Consumer Reports. It found that 69 percent of all raw pork samples tested — nearly 200 samples in total — were contaminated with the dangerous bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica, which causes fever and gastrointestinal illness with diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps.

The pork also tested positive for other contaminants, including the controversial drug ractopamine, which is banned in many parts of the world. Worst of all, many of the bacteria found in the pork were resistant to multiple antibiotics, weakening the immune system and compromising medical treatment with potentially lethal results. 

And much like other countries, what happens on the farm doesn’t stay on the farm – and it can impact human health.    Said a press release on the study, “Manure, compost, or soil containing antibiotic-resistant bacteria could thwart the efficacy of human antibiotic therapies if it runs off into rivers, leaches into groundwater, is dispersed as dust, or if composted manure is distributed as organic fertilizer, according to the authors.”

There is some good news, however.  Any of our customers operating pig farms have successfully overcome, and in many cases, eliminated these issues by using PurOxi products and systems.  Clean ~ Clear ~ Nutritional ~ Water is a cornerstone in their healthy, prosperous operations.

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Source: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/02/china-antibiotic-resistent-bacteria-found-in-pig-manure/#.UR_aJfLaKSo

For full report and scientific evidence visit http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/02/05/1222743110 and click on the links provided.  Click here for the pdf file.

 

 

It’s all about the Drought!

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August 26  |  crops, Dairy, Editorial, Farm, Latest News, Livestock, Newsletters, Opinion  |   Webmaster

Unless we’ve been in a cave or in outer space for the past few weeks, we are all aware of the severe drought that has been plaguing the Midwest.  Actually, you can see its effects from space:

 http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/us-drought-so-bad-nasa-can-see-it-space.html

This is the worst drought since 1988 and may go on record for causing the worst economic and social effects since the infamous 1930s “Dustbowl”.  It may take years to recover as a nation, but many small & medium size farms may not survive it.

The USDA is issuing weekly updates …

http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/08/24/agricultural-weather-and-drought-update-%e2%80%93-82412/

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=DISASTER_ASSISTANCE

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

It’s estimated that this current drought is affecting over 68% of farmland and over 80% of essential crops in those areas, especially corn, hay, soya beans, etc.  And the effects will be felt across the nation with rising food prices and a strained federal budget to try and offset some of the losses.  Thank God for crop insurance!  Payouts from this year’s drought are expected to set record levels.  Unfortunately, livestock producers and dairy farmers have no such safety net.  Various government levels have tried to open up reserve land for grazing, water-sharing programs, meat buying programs, etc. but it is a drop in the bucket.  Clean water and grazing lands are becoming scarce and feed corn and hay have doubled in price since 2010.

While the debate rages on about whether global warming is the cause or whether this is just one of earth’s cycles of change and the while the policy makers on Capitol Hill bicker about their partisan lobby interests, farmers and ranchers struggle to survive, waiting for the much anticipated Farm Bill to finally become law.  It may be too late or not enough for some.   These dedicated, hearty individuals are used to struggle and adversity and being dependent on Mother Nature.   But they don’t like to depend on any level government.  Emergency drought legislation would surely help right now.

Meanwhile, more and more farmers and ranchers are taking to the internet and social media to stay connected, updated, and to network with others, sharing stories, ideas, and recommendations.  In fact, they have their own hashtag on Twitter: #drought12.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/08/24/159999270/farmers-waiting-out-the-drought-tune-into-twitter

Yes, this has been and will continue to be a very tough year for those dear folks.  Next to oxygen and water, they are responsible for the most important ingredient for our life – FOOD!  We are grateful for their dedication, hard work and pioneer spirit and are proud to be a part of their operations.

Let’s all offer them whatever support we can and pray for them.

 

Following are some links of interest to this ongoing story.  There are many more.

 

http://cropwatch.unl.edu/croprss/-/journal_content/56/1841/4969212?

http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/24/us/drought-missouri-dairy-farmers/index.html

http://www.agprofessional.com/news/Farmers-persevering-through-drought-167350075.html

http://farmprogress.com/customPage.aspx?p=382

http://science.time.com/2012/07/18/how-the-drought-of-2012-will-make-your-food-more-expensive/

http://www.businessinsider.com/photos-of-drought-devastating-american-farmland-2012-7?op=1

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/science/topics/drought/index.html

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/08/23/f-drought-climate-change.html

http://www.fb.org/

 

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Dairy Farmers left out in the heat with no assistance from govt.

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August 26  |  crops, Dairy, Editorial, Farm, Latest News, Livestock, Opinion  |   Webmaster

“Where’s the Beef?”

Dairy Farmers left to fend for themselves while partisan politics delay the Farm Bill.

No emergency drought assistance forthcoming.

 

The drought pushed fifth-generation dairy farmer Mark Argall out of the business    photo by Brandon Ancil/CNN

 

Small and medium sized dairy farms are barely hanging on, while some are selling off parts of their herd and others unwillingly going out of business, while Capitol Hill drags it feet in passing the omnibus Farm Bill.

The Obama administration earlier this month announced emergency drought assistance that included low-interest emergency loans; a federal buy-up of meat from livestock producers; and the opening up of some protected lands for livestock grazing.

None of those efforts are targeted at dairy farmers, however, dairy advocates say.

Farmers in southern Missouri are selling of dairy cows because their fields have dried up. photo by Brandon Ancil / CNN

 

Missouri’s governor, meanwhile, created a cost-share program to help farmers get access to water for their cattle, but McCallister said that’s more of a Band-Aid than a real solution.

Michael Scuse, under-secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said dairy farmers have not been offered enough of a safety net because Congress has not finalized an omnibus piece of legislation called the Farm Bill.

“Had we had a Farm Bill passed by now, there’s a very good chance we could offer some additional assistance” to dairy farmers who are struggling because of the drought, he said.

Several programs that deal with emergency assistance for livestock owners expired in September 2011; and an insurance program for livestock producers, which he said “never had adequate funding,” will be cut further in September and eliminated by October 1 unless new legislation is passed, he said.

 

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