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Immune System

Water for Livestock

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January 20  |  antibiotics, Beef, Business Opportunity, Case Studies, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water, testimonials  |   Webmaster

Providing enough quality water is essential for good livestock husbandry.

Water makes up 80% of the blood, regulates body temperature and is vital for organ functions such as digestion, waste removal, the absorption of nutrients (feed conversion), lactation, and much more. Understanding daily livestock watering needs is key when designing a livestock watering system.

The daily water requirement of livestock varies significantly depending on animal species, size and growth stage. Environmental aspects as well as the QUALITY of water, also impact the amount of water intake. PUROXI improves the quality of your water and delivery systems ensuring your livestock will drink the recommended amount.

Click on the links below for additional information, facts, and articles of interest. You can also use the Search function tool (top right corner) to find items of interest.

Water Requirements for Livestock

Advantages of PUROXI Water Treatment

Product brochures for various species

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Importance of Water-Dairy Calves

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July 23  |  Dairy, Farm, Farmers, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, News, Nutrition  |   Webmaster

Following is an excellent and timely article from Progressive Dairyman magazine re: the importance of water for dairy.

The award-winning magazine’s editors and contributors provide compelling features, helpful articles, insightful news analysis, and entertaining commentary about the people, practices and topics related to a dairy lifestyle.

Why high-quality water matters for calf success

Contributed by Ellan Dufour Published on 30 May 2018

Often overlooked, water is the most important nutrient for dairy calves. It is required for all of life’s processes including the transport, digestion and metabolism of nutrients, the elimination of waste materials and excess heat from the body, and the maintenance of a proper fluid-ion balance in the body.

The role of water in young calves

Offering calves free-choice water is critical for stimulating rumen development, improving grain fermentation and promoting starter intake. The quality of water offered can play a major role in calf health and nutrient utilization.

Rumen development: Unlike milk and milk replacer, water consumed by young calves is transported to the rumen rather than the abomasum. Water in the rumen provides a medium for ruminal bacteria to ferment starter feed, grain and hay. Rumen development is slowed in the absence of water.

Improved growth: Calves offered free-choice water in addition to their liquid diet are shown to gain weight faster and consume dry feed quicker than calves only receiving water through their milk or milk replacer.

Calf health: Calves are about 70 to 75 percent water by bodyweight and need to consume fresh water in order to maintain normal cellular functions. Dehydration can lead to weakness, severe weight loss and even death. Signs of dehydration include sunken eyes, dry mouth and nose, tacky gums, depressed demeanor, irregular pulse and cold legs and ears.

How much and when?

  • Pre-weaning: On average, calves consume 1 quart of water per pound of dry matter intake.
  • Post-weaning: Calves should consume 2 quarts of water per pound of dry matter intake. This ratio should extend through the heifer growing period.
  • Hot weather: Expect water consumption to increase by 33 percent or more as temperatures reach the high 70s, and anticipate it may double as temperatures pass 90ºF.

Factors affecting water quality

Offering poor-quality water to the young calf may impact water consumption and starter intake, calf health, rumen development and the value of milk replacer and electrolytes. There are many criteria involved in assessing water quality. These include organoleptic properties (odor and taste), physiochemical properties (pH, total dissolved solids [TDS], total soluble salts and hardness), presence of toxic compounds, presence of excess minerals or compounds (see Table 1), and presence of bacteria.

Hardness: Calves are very sensitive to sodium and struggle to tolerate excess sodium levels. Soft water or hard water that has passed through a water softener can have very high concentrations of sodium and should not be used to mix milk replacer or be offered as drinking water unless tested. High sodium levels can lead to neurological diseases and central nervous system derangement in young calves.

Osmolarity: In situations where total solids are high in milk or milk replacer (over 15 percent), offering high-quality water can sustain the osmotic equilibrium in a calf. High total solids can force water out of cells in an effort to find osmotic balance within the gut and can result in diarrhea and severe dehydration. Water provision is especially important for calves fed an accelerated milk replacer program to ensure proper hydration.

Bacteria: Coliform bacteria like E. Coli and salmonella may be present in poor-quality water or water contaminated by feces and can quickly and exponentially increase to dangerous levels in a calf if consumed. In both cases, calves may suffer from severe dehydration and diarrhea. Salmonella may also result in pneumonia and septicemia in infected animals. Water with high iron content is at an increased risk of salmonella contamination.

Minerals: Calves are more sensitive to elevated mineral levels than adult cattle, making excessive mineral concentrations in drinking water a particular concern. Upper concentrations and maximum tolerable concentrations of minerals for dairy cattle are shown in Table 1 (below).  Minerals of particular concern when in high concentrations include cobalt, copper, iron, hydrogen sulfide, manganese and sulfur.

Take-home messages

  • Ensure calves are consistently provided with clean, fresh, and readily available water.
  • Keep water buckets clean and free of contamination from starter feed and feces.
  • Know the least expensive and most efficient method available to modify mineral and microbial concentration of water offered to calves.
  • Check your water quality frequently. At minimum, water fed to calves should be tested annually.

 

Ellan Dufour is a dairy research nutritionist with Hubbard Feeds.Source: https://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/calves-heifers/why-high-quality-water-matters-for-calf-success

To download a pdf version of this article, please click here

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Video

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June 25  |  crops, Dairy, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

We invite you to view our short 3 minute presentation to introduce you to Puroxi Pure Water Global Inc. ~ an international company recognized as a leader in Water Treatment for farms, crops, residential, municipal, commercial applications.

 

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Drugs in Our Water

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February 8  |  antibiotics, Editorial, Immune System, News, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

What do all these have in common?

  1. Prescription drugs such as hormones (birth control pills, estrogen replacement drugs, etc.), antidepressants, and antibiotics; and,
  2. Over-the-counter medications such as pain relievers (aspirin, ibuprofen, etc.), cold/flu remedies, and antiseptics (germ killing liquids); and,
  3. Veterinary medicines.

They have all been detected in rivers, lakes and coastal waters throughout the United States and Europe in increasing concentrations of parts per billion to parts per trillion.

There are two ways that medications enter the sewer system and wind up at a wastewater treatment plant: (1) excretion by the human body in urine and feces and (2) disposal of unused or expired medications down the toilet or drain.

Wastewater treatment plants are designed to remove conventional pollutants such as solids and biodegradable materials; they are not designed to remove man-made pollutants such as medications,  which are only partially destroyed and then discharged to rivers or the ocean. These same water bodies are the source of drinking water for many communities, so there is a growing concern about long-term health effects on humans, fish, and animals.  

The growing concern has also spawned numerous scientific studies by various governments, institutions, and NGOs.  Recent studies have found that human drugs can disrupt the biology and behavior of fish and other aquatic life at very low concentrations.  Of particular concern is the alarming increase of hormone disruptive chemicals being found in our waterways,  which affect the conception, development, puberty, and procreation.  One news report calls these “Gender Bending Chemicals” because of their effect on male development.

William Duke photo credit

 

What are the solutions?  Stop flushing unused medications, vitamins, etc. down the sink or toilet.  Lobby your municipality and local governments to install more effective processing systems, such as, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation, UV and hydrogen peroxide.

Sources used for this article:

http://paper.li/f-1366553404#!health

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/science/2015/02/06/001-medicament-eau-poissons.shtml

http://www.beachapedia.org/Drugs_in_the_Water

http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/06/17/Gender-Bending-Chemicals/

http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/11707/

http://www.jsonline.com/news/health/

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FDA voluntary guidelines to restrict non-therapeutic use of antibiotics

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July 13  |  antibiotics, Beef, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Nutrition, Pork, Poultry, Research  |   Webmaster

In December, the FDA asked animal health companies to voluntarily stop using antibiotics to promote growth of meatier cows, pigs, and other livestock.  This is known as non-therapeutic use.

According to a recent report by the FDA, 25 sponsors confirmed in writing their intent to engage with FDA as defined in Guidance #213 and have given FDA consent to list their names in this update.  These 25 sponsors hold 99.6 percent of the applications affected by Guidance #213 and include subsidiaries of Bayer and Eli-Lilly.

Click here for a complete list of companies represented.

The guidelines are meant to thwart the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, which some scientists blame on antibiotics in the food supply. Drug-resistant bacteria strike 2 million Americans a year and cause 23,000 deaths, according to the CDC. The FDA has long been under fire for failing to keep a lid on antibiotic use in farm animals. In January, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) released a report containing evidence that the FDA’s scientists were aware of 18 farm antibiotics that posed a high risk of spawning antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 

However, critics claim that 89 percent of antibiotic drugs that the guidelines advise against using to speed growth can still be given to healthy animals for other reasons, such as disease prevention. They also contend that since the system is voluntary, it gives the pharamaceutical companies too much discretion and leeway in conducting their own policy and enforcement methods, especially on large factory farms, and with easily obtained OTC (over the counter) drugs.  Critics are demanding a complete ban on antibiotics/ antimicrobials for non-therapeutic use.

Following is a link to a recent Reuters News article which offers a well-balanced summary of this story.

Reuters U.S. Edition – March 27, 2014.
 

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Health Canada restricts antibiotics

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July 13  |  antibiotics, Beef, Editorial, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Opinion, Pork, Poultry, Press Release, Research  |   Webmaster

Health Canada restricts use of antibiotics for growth in livestock

In an effort to curb drug-resistant superbugs, Health Canada is restricting the use of antibiotics in livestock.

Producers will no longer be allowed to continuously feed animals low-level doses as a way to promote growth.

Dr. Trisha Dowling, a pharmacologist with the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, says penicillin and tetracycline have long been fed to livestock in order to reduce the workload of animals’ immune systems, thereby causing them to grow faster using less feed.

She says in many cases, products specifically marketed as growth-promotants are older drugs that have fallen out of use in humans as bacteria have developed resistance.

The rules do still allow in-feed antibiotics as a preventative measure against disease.

Dowling says that in many cases, the exception means business-as-usual for producers.

She says this was especially true in the poultry industry, where improved growth is essentially a side benefit for producers using the drugs to prevent infections that can wipe out whole barns if they get a foothold.

“If you don’t put (antibiotics) in the feed, and you wait until you get an outbreak of necrotic enteritis, you’ve got a lot of dead birds and you’ve lost a lot of money,” she said.

On the cattle side, Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association CEO Craig Douglas said most producers don’t feed antibiotics.

“Without singling out any other industry — it’s other sectors where that’s been more of a standard procedure,” he said.

Douglas said most ranchers only reach for the antibiotics when an animal is clearly unwell.

“They’re not medicating their animals unless their sick,” he said, adding that costs as high as $500 per animal tends to keep the use of injected antibiotics in check.

~ The Canadian Press – Friday, July 11, 2014

 

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Antibiotic Resistance in China

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February 16  |  antibiotics, Case Studies, Farm, food safety, Immune System, Latest News, Livestock, Pork, Research  |   Webmaster

More disturbing news from China. A news alert from Food Safety News reveals that manure from Chinese pig farms contains both antibiotic residues and high concentrations of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

The new study published Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences adds to the evidence that antibiotics used by China’s pork producers pose significant health risks. The study also found that once manure leaves the farm, its potential for spreading antibiotic resistance to other surrounding bacteria in the environment is much diminished, but not eliminated. Why should this concern us?  Because it is becoming a worldwide problem.  “We’re not trying to single out the Chinese here. This is a global problem,” said James Tiedje, a microbiologist from Michigan State University who joined the team of Chinese researchers for the project.

Pork production with antibiotic use has been growing rapidly in China, where half of world’s pigs are grown for a country with a growing appetite for pork. Demand for pork has increased in the orient, while it is steadily dropping in western countries, and almost non-existent in the middle and near east countries. For a variety of religious, cultural, and personal health reasons, a huge and growing segment of the world’s population abstains from pork and the mounting evidence seems to support their position.

Closer to home, a recent article by Dr. Mercola detailed surprising and disturbing results in a new investigation by Consumer Reports. It found that 69 percent of all raw pork samples tested — nearly 200 samples in total — were contaminated with the dangerous bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica, which causes fever and gastrointestinal illness with diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps.

The pork also tested positive for other contaminants, including the controversial drug ractopamine, which is banned in many parts of the world. Worst of all, many of the bacteria found in the pork were resistant to multiple antibiotics, weakening the immune system and compromising medical treatment with potentially lethal results. 

And much like other countries, what happens on the farm doesn’t stay on the farm – and it can impact human health.    Said a press release on the study, “Manure, compost, or soil containing antibiotic-resistant bacteria could thwart the efficacy of human antibiotic therapies if it runs off into rivers, leaches into groundwater, is dispersed as dust, or if composted manure is distributed as organic fertilizer, according to the authors.”

There is some good news, however.  Any of our customers operating pig farms have successfully overcome, and in many cases, eliminated these issues by using PurOxi products and systems.  Clean ~ Clear ~ Nutritional ~ Water is a cornerstone in their healthy, prosperous operations.

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Source: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/02/china-antibiotic-resistent-bacteria-found-in-pig-manure/#.UR_aJfLaKSo

For full report and scientific evidence visit http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/02/05/1222743110 and click on the links provided.  Click here for the pdf file.

 

 

Antibiotic Farm Use

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June 30  |  antibiotics, Case Studies, Editorial, Farm, food safety, Immune System, Livestock, News, Nutrition, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

The use and/or overuse of antibiotics on farms continues to generate controversy.  While opposite sides continue to argue their respective positions, we feel that it’s important to maintain a level-headed position and research and examine all of the facts. 

Without a doubt, antibiotics have improved the quality of life for all of us, including our livestock and food sources.   Can you imagine a world without anitbiotics?  Scary indeed!

We strongly agree with the agricultural community that a responsible antibiotic regimen is essential to maintaining a safe, healthy and efficient operation.  However, it’s also common knowledge that antibiotic use has surged during the past decade, which has many experts worried that we are creating a dangerous level of resistance to bacteria and viruses.

The prestigious journal Nature this week called for reining in the use of antibiotics in agriculture, adding to the growing chorus of scientists and public health advocates seeking reforms.  The editorial noted that the overuse of antibiotics in livestock raising is a global issue, in part because pathogens do not respect international borders — “As long as any one country pumps its pigs and poultry full of drugs, everyone is at risk.”

Following are links to the report and comments.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/06/journal-nature-farmers-should-rein-in-antibiotic-use-worldwide/

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v486/n7404/full/486440a.html

While the debate rages on, and various special interest groups lobby all levels of government, please don’t blame the farmers! They are all working hard to ensure that we all have safe, healthy food to feed our families, and also incurring a lot of extra expense in doing so. 

We would like to remind you that one of the many benefits of using our Oxy Blast products is the reduced dependency on antibiotics.  Why?  Because they help antibiotics work more effectively and efficiently!  This has proven to be an economical option for many of our clients.

We invite you to watch our short movie presentation at www.oxyblast.org/movie, introducing our products and services.

 

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Water Poultry and Oxy Blast

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June 24  |  antibiotics, Case Studies, Farm, Immune System, Latest News, Poultry  |   Webmaster

Water, Poultry, and Oxy Blast

 

Water is a critical nutrient that receives little attention until a problem arises. Not only should producers make an effort to provide water in adequate quantity, they should also know what is in the water that will be flowing through the water lines to be used in evaporative cooling systems and consumed by the birds.

 

Water Functions

Water is needed for bird consumption, reducing air temperature (including evaporative cooling pad and fogging systems) and facility sanitation. Broilers consume approximately 1.6 to 2.0 times as much water as feed on a weight basis. Water is a critical nutrient in bird metabolism and nutrition. From a physiology perspective, water consumed by the bird is used for nutrient transportation, enzymatic and chemical reactions in the body, body temperature regulation and lubrication of joints and organs.

There is a strong relationship between feed and water consumption, therefore, water can be used to monitor flock performance.

Environmental temperature/heat stress: Birds consume more water as temperature increases. One of the main ways birds regulate body temperature is by evaporating water through the respiratory system during panting. As birds pant, water is lost and needs to be replaced in order to maintain body-water balance. Water consumption can double and even triple during periods of heat stress. Water consumption in broilers increases approximately seven per cent for each degree Fahrenheit increase in temperature.

The correlation of water consumption with feed intake and many environmental factors indicate its importance in bird metabolism and body function. Efforts should be made in all poultry operations to ensure that adequate and unlimited access to water is provided. Failure to do so will result in reduced feed intake, poor egg production, reduced growth and reduced feed efficiency.

Water quality should be of concern to all poultry operations. Poor water quality may interfere with digestion and subsequent bird performance. The effectiveness of vaccines and medications administered through the water lines could be reduced when water quality is poor. Water contaminants could create equipment problems that would either restrict the amount of water available for consumption or the effectiveness of the evaporative cooling and fogging systems. Reduced water consumption or cooling capacity may have detrimental effects on both growth and reproduction. Poor water quality could also result in leaky water nipples inside the house, which will wet litter and lead to increased ammonia production. Poor litter quality and high ammonia can result in reduced performance and livability.


How can Oxy Blast help?

Please read on …

While our focus here is on poultry, remember that using a custom developed Oxy Blast protocol will deliver similar results with ALL species of livestock.  Many of you have seen very satisfying results already.

Using Oxy Blast products along with a customized protocol will result in:

 cleaner water, nipples not plugging up, lower death loss, better feed conversion, better weight gains, less leg and tendon problems, drier litter, increased water consumption, lowered medication cost, lower antibiotic use, improved daily gains, and a natural de-worming effect.

 And it all begins with an independent water report and analysis by our panel of experts!

The poultry industry in India, broiler chickens in particular, is experiencing a very stressful time.

We are getting reports of 50-60% mortality rates on some major farms due to the severity of hot weather!  The birds are getting over-heated, dehydrated, distressed, unable to feed efficiently, and are more prone to disease and infection.  Soaring temperatures, increase in disease & infestation, lack of adequate fresh water, higher costs for power & feed, all combine to create the “PERFECT STORM” for lower production and increased costs. Despite this, demand continues to increase 10-20% annually

As you will read in the attached news article, overall production is down by almost 50% and is still increasing, despite increased costs.  The farm operators cannot keep up and many are facing collapse.  It may take 4 months or more to recover. 

We have shared our success story with you already, but here are the latest details documented by our Dealer.

                                                     Industry average               Oxy Blast farm

  • average broiler weight                       0.7 kg                1.7 kg
  • mortality rate                                     50% +                 0. 5%
  • medication                                          $45/day             $15/day (OB)
  • increase in production                        -50%                +100%

Healthier birds, more than double the weight gain = double the sales & profits, with almost zero death loss, and still saving $30/day on antibiotics.  FANTASTIC!

If we can do it here, we can do it anywhere.  If we can do it with poultry, we can do it with dairy cows, beef cattle, sheep, goats, horses, etc., etc.

– Get the water report & analysis – Follow the recommended protocol

– Gaining happy, life-long customers, one at a time

Oxy Blast works!

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Oxy Blast follow up in India

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June 19  |  antibiotics, Farm, Immune System, Latest News, Poultry, Reports, Tests  |   Webmaster

Oxy Blast is revolutionizing India.  This just keeps getting better! 

I just got off the phone with our dealer in India with updated information.   No antibiotics have been used through this entire process.   The average cost for anitbiotics on this farm was $45.00 U.S. per day.  The complete Oxy Blast protocol has so far averaged only $15.00.

As of today we are down to .0003% mortality.  That is in just 7 Days – amazing!   And all at 1/3 of his previous cost using antibiotics and other hopeful solutions. The farmer is over-joyed and can’t wait to start our Oxy Blast protocol from the very beginning with the new batch of chicks arriving in a couple of days. 

Once word spreads, we will be inundated with requests from other chicken operations, especially with the Eid festival coming up soon, when the demand for chickens surges.  We will have to ramp up our dealership and distribution systems accordingly throughout all of India.

We’ll keep you updated 🙂

P.S.  How could you benefit from Oxy Blast ?

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