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Editorial

World Water Day 2015

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March 22  |  climate change, Editorial, global warming, News, Nutrition, Opinion, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

World Water Day 2015

World Water Day logo

This year’s theme is Water and Sustainable Development

Visit http://www.unwater.org/worldwaterday/ for more details.

What does WATER mean to you?  Search #wateris and #WorldWaterDay

 

We spill it, drink it, bathe in it, cook with it, flush it, run it down the drain and the gutter, drench the lawn and wash the car with it.

While we waste perfectly good water and don’t give a second thought, the following statistics should be a sober wake-up call to all of us to be more respectful and conserving of this valuable resource.  Water is truly the lifeblood of our precious earth.

  • An astounding 1,400 children die every day from diseases linked to unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation.
  • Roughly 75% of all industrial water withdrawals are used for energy production.
  • There are 658 million people living without access to water in Africa.
  • By 2035, the global energy demand is projected to grow by more than one-third.
  • Diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water, sanitation and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally, which is 2,300 people per day.
  • 750 million people lack access to clean water, which is over double the population of the United States.
  • 82% of those who lack access to improved water live in rural areas.

The water crisis is the number one global risk based on impact to society (as a measure of devastation) and the eighth global risk based on likelihood (likelihood of occurring within ten years), according to the World Economic Forum.

The UN says the planet is facing a 40% shortfall in water supply by 2030, unless the world dramatically improves the management of this precious resource.

This is the conclusion reached in the 2015 United Nations World Water Development Report, “Water for a Sustainable World” launched in New Delhi ahead of World Water Day on 22 March.

The theme of 2015 it’s about how water links to all areas we need to consider to create the future we want.

water in hands

Join the 2015 campaign to raise awareness of water and sanitation. You can also contribute on social media though the hashtags #WaterIs and #WorldWaterDay.

World Water Day is marked on 22 March every year. It’s a day to celebrate water. It’s a day to make a difference for the members of the global population who suffer from water related issues. It’s a day to prepare for how we manage water in the future.

In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March as the first World Water Day. 22 years later, World Water Day is celebrated around the world every year, shining the spotlight on a different issue.

We invite you to do your own research and see how you can make a difference.  Following is a link to  a short video by the UN to get you started …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1Zwd4B_Zqw

 

 

 

 

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Drugs in Our Water

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February 8  |  antibiotics, Editorial, Immune System, News, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

What do all these have in common?

  1. Prescription drugs such as hormones (birth control pills, estrogen replacement drugs, etc.), antidepressants, and antibiotics; and,
  2. Over-the-counter medications such as pain relievers (aspirin, ibuprofen, etc.), cold/flu remedies, and antiseptics (germ killing liquids); and,
  3. Veterinary medicines.

They have all been detected in rivers, lakes and coastal waters throughout the United States and Europe in increasing concentrations of parts per billion to parts per trillion.

There are two ways that medications enter the sewer system and wind up at a wastewater treatment plant: (1) excretion by the human body in urine and feces and (2) disposal of unused or expired medications down the toilet or drain.

Wastewater treatment plants are designed to remove conventional pollutants such as solids and biodegradable materials; they are not designed to remove man-made pollutants such as medications,  which are only partially destroyed and then discharged to rivers or the ocean. These same water bodies are the source of drinking water for many communities, so there is a growing concern about long-term health effects on humans, fish, and animals.  

The growing concern has also spawned numerous scientific studies by various governments, institutions, and NGOs.  Recent studies have found that human drugs can disrupt the biology and behavior of fish and other aquatic life at very low concentrations.  Of particular concern is the alarming increase of hormone disruptive chemicals being found in our waterways,  which affect the conception, development, puberty, and procreation.  One news report calls these “Gender Bending Chemicals” because of their effect on male development.

William Duke photo credit

 

What are the solutions?  Stop flushing unused medications, vitamins, etc. down the sink or toilet.  Lobby your municipality and local governments to install more effective processing systems, such as, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation, UV and hydrogen peroxide.

Sources used for this article:

http://paper.li/f-1366553404#!health

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/science/2015/02/06/001-medicament-eau-poissons.shtml

http://www.beachapedia.org/Drugs_in_the_Water

http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/06/17/Gender-Bending-Chemicals/

http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/11707/

http://www.jsonline.com/news/health/

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Providing Safe Water in a Disaster

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November 9  |  Editorial, Emergency Preparedness, News, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

by Mark Owen – founder CEO of Puralytics
 
Every year, our planet experiences an average of 500 natural disasters (Gutierrez, 2008). While some have minimal impact, others may disrupt our standard of living for days, weeks, or even months- restricting our access to food, medical care, and potable water sources. In a recent report by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, more than 32.4 million people were displaced worldwide by natural disasters in 2012 (Activity Report 2012, 2013). In an assessment of all global risks, water crises was the 3rdlargest risk, and the one identified as having the largest impact and the most likely to occur (Jennifer Blanke, 2014).
 

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Figure 1: Aid workers in Tacloban City, Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan bring SolarBags for their own use.

Disaster & Water

In a disaster, electricity is lost and water infrastructure is damaged. Fresh water sources might be polluted with all of the chemical toxins in the region as well as sewage and physical debris. First responders refer to the “Rule of Threes” – 3 minutes without air, 3 days without water, and 3 weeks without food/shelter and people will die. In recent disasters, like the Typhoon in the Philippines, the Tsunami in Japan, Hurricane Sandy and Katrina, and the earthquakes in Haiti, for instance, by Day 3 of the crisis, water became extremely valuable – the most expensive water on the planet – flown in by helicopters by emergency medical personnel and first responders, or supplied by desalination systems on battleships in the harbor. In many of these disasters, the water need continued for 3-18 months after the initial disaster had passed, and became the greatest risk of survival.

In the first days of such a crisis, bottled water is often flown in and distributed, both for the protection of the aid workers and emergency responders, and for those immediately displaced by the disaster. Stored or supplied bottled water runs out in a few days. Within the first week or so, it becomes impractical to supply water this way, and aid agencies switch to interim disinfection strategies like boiling water, chlorine or iodine tablets. These are able to partially disinfect the water and filters can remove some particulates, but they are not able to remove the chemical toxins that are also in the available water sources. While is it is widely recognized that water must be both disinfected and detoxified to be a safe water source, disinfection only solutions are acceptable for short periods as outbreaks are the largest short term risk.

These minimalist disinfection-only solutions were satisfactory for short term solutions with clear water sources, but as the disaster expands to weeks and months, the shortcomings of these methods become significant. Chemical toxins left in the water from the disaster, like petrochemicals, pesticides, cleaning supplies, pharmaceuticals, heavy metals, etc. become a significant threat to health that could impact those affected for years to come. Unfortunately, most people who prepare for a disaster, and most government and aid organization that provide support after a disaster do not have equipment to detoxify the water from these chemical toxins. Water quality quickly becomes the biggest risk after the first days of the crisis, and may continue to be for weeks, months, or even years ahead.

The Puralytics SolarBag is unique in an emergency, because it can both disinfect and detoxify the water, providing safe water that meets US EPA and World Health Organization’s “highly protective” safe water guidelines as shown in Figure 2. Sunlight, even on a cloudy day, activates the nanotechnology coated mesh insert, activating 5 photochemical processes that purify water and reduce or destroy contaminants found in virtually all water sources.

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Figure 2: Comparing different water treatment technologies, only one is able to both disinfect and detoxify the water.

The SolarBag can treat up to 9 liters of water per day and can be reused over 500 times.
It can be stored for 7 years or more, and can be used by anyone, even children, to purify virtually any water source to make safe water. It is also very light to transport – while 1 gallon of water weighs about 8 lbs, 1 SolarBag which can make 500 gallons weighs only 4 ounces. Imagine if the aid organizations passed out SolarBags instead of bottled water or chlorine tablets in the early days of a disaster how many more people would be helped in a time of need.

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Figure 3: Planning for an emergency longer than 3 days requires being able to treat water to both disinfect and detoxify the water.

While this patented technology is relatively new and only mentioned in the most recent survival handbooks, it is widely available in stores and online sources. It has also been shipped to over 50 countries, including the recent disaster in the Philippines, being handed out through organizations like Medical Teams International, Relief International, Forward Edge International, and by the Red Cross. Recently Puralytics won the International Water Association’s Global Honour Award for long term use of the SolarBag in rural villages in Africa. For more information on the SolarBag, see the company’s website – www.puralytics.com

 

References

(2013). Activity Report 2012. Geneva: The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre.

Gutierrez, D. (2008). Natural Disasters Up More Than 400 Percent in Two Decades. Natural News.

Jennifer Blanke, e. a. (2014). Global Risk 2014, Ninth Edition. World Economic Forum.

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Water Innovation Award

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July 27  |  Editorial, Latest News, News, Newsletters, Press Release, Trade Shows  |   Webmaster

LG Sound has been honoured with the WTP Water Innovation Award in Brussels.

Water Innovation Europe

Click the links below to view the web pages …

LG Sound receives WTP Water Innovation Award with new MPC-Buoy

wsstp award 620x413 LG Sound receives WssTP Water Innovation Award with new MPC Buoy

http://www.waterinnovationeurope.eu/

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Health Canada restricts antibiotics

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July 13  |  antibiotics, Beef, Editorial, Farm, Farmers, food safety, Immune System, Opinion, Pork, Poultry, Press Release, Research  |   Webmaster

Health Canada restricts use of antibiotics for growth in livestock

In an effort to curb drug-resistant superbugs, Health Canada is restricting the use of antibiotics in livestock.

Producers will no longer be allowed to continuously feed animals low-level doses as a way to promote growth.

Dr. Trisha Dowling, a pharmacologist with the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, says penicillin and tetracycline have long been fed to livestock in order to reduce the workload of animals’ immune systems, thereby causing them to grow faster using less feed.

She says in many cases, products specifically marketed as growth-promotants are older drugs that have fallen out of use in humans as bacteria have developed resistance.

The rules do still allow in-feed antibiotics as a preventative measure against disease.

Dowling says that in many cases, the exception means business-as-usual for producers.

She says this was especially true in the poultry industry, where improved growth is essentially a side benefit for producers using the drugs to prevent infections that can wipe out whole barns if they get a foothold.

“If you don’t put (antibiotics) in the feed, and you wait until you get an outbreak of necrotic enteritis, you’ve got a lot of dead birds and you’ve lost a lot of money,” she said.

On the cattle side, Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association CEO Craig Douglas said most producers don’t feed antibiotics.

“Without singling out any other industry — it’s other sectors where that’s been more of a standard procedure,” he said.

Douglas said most ranchers only reach for the antibiotics when an animal is clearly unwell.

“They’re not medicating their animals unless their sick,” he said, adding that costs as high as $500 per animal tends to keep the use of injected antibiotics in check.

~ The Canadian Press – Friday, July 11, 2014

 

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A Tribute to Dairy Farmers

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April 23  |  Dairy, Editorial, Farm, Farmers, Opinion  |   Webmaster

This page is dedicated to Dairy Farmers as a tribute and acknowledgement for their hard work, dedication, and care.  We admire and respect all farm operators, especially family operations which take pride in providing us all with safe, nutritional food.

While Puroxi Pure Water Global has expanded its reach with new products, systems, throughout international markets, we will always have a special fondness for farm operators, particularly dairy farmers.  This hardy savvy group was the first to see the benefits of our product and appreciate the results.

Dairy farmers work hard every day to bring you and your family fresh, great tasting, wholesome milk products.  Almost all dairies are family-owned, and as active members of their communities, farm families take pride in feeding our country and maintaining natural resources.  That means preserving the land where they live and work, protecting the air and water they share with neighbors, and providing the best care for their cows—the lifeblood of their business.

Read more at www.dairyfarming.org

dairy farmer

Some Dairy Facts:

• Average number of cows in milking herd: 70

• Canada has 12,529 dairy farms with almost 1 million cows

• Canadian dairy farmers sell an average of 7.31 billion litres of milk annually to processors

• Three main processors process approximately 80% of the milk produced in Canada

• There are approximately 450 milk processors in Canada

• 700 kinds of cheese are made in Canada

• Sales of milk and dairy products contribute $10 billion to the Canadian economy

• Ontario’s milk production in 2012 was 2.6 billion litres of milk

• The farm gate value of milk from Ontario’s dairy farms is about $1.9 billion annually and  accounts for about 19 per cent of the province’s agricultural production

• Licensed dairy farms in Ontario as of December 2012: 4,100

• Average age of Canadian dairy farmers: 47

• Number of dairy cows in Ontario in 2012: 315,000 milking cows plus 173,000 heifers over one year old.

~ Facts courtesy of Dairy Farmers of Ontario

Read more about dairy families here:

http://www.prairiefarms.com/about-families-helping-families.aspx 

Following are some other links to information, fact sheets, videos and more, to help you understand a dairy farmer’s life & perspective …

Watch the real life stories of the dairy farmers behind 100% Canadian milk

Life on the Farm

Dairy Farmers of Canada

So God Made a Dairy Farmer

Dairy Farmers of Canada

Ask a Dairy Farmer

Myths vs. Facts

Dairy Nutrition Facts

2014 Milk Calendar 


Farmers’ Voice is a blog that gives Canadian dairy farmers a place to share their stories and talk about life on a dairy farm, in their own words. Written by dairy farmers who provide milk that is among the best in the world, Farmers’ Voice offers an insider perspective on subjects that matter to farmers.  See http://www.dairyfarmers.ca/farmers-voice/

 

 

 

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Climate Change | Water Shortage | Agriculture

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December 29  |  climate change, crops, Editorial, Farm, global warming, Nutrition, Opinion, Research, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

While the pundits and partisan experts continue to argue over the validity of global warming, there is little doubt that climate change is a reality.  The rapidly increasing changes in our climate are impacting our water supply.

Scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have calculated how much of this essential resource the world risks losing to the effects of climate change.  Droughts will become more widespread and wildfires are expected to get bigger, longer and smokier by 2050. The growing world population and its increase in water consumption are also straining fresh water resources.  Water sources are melting and drying out.   

37 nations already make do with the bare minimum in water resources, according to experts at the World Resources Institute (WRI), a co-author of the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas.  Massive investments in efficient water management are necessary to counter the effects of water scarcity.

 Agriculture is the world’s largest consumer of water

In times of rising food prices, the agricultural sector has become more interesting for investors. Asian companies, particularly in China, as well as their European counterparts are buying up large swaths of land in Africa to grow food products. They, too, have a vested interest in good harvests and are keen on investment in any aspect of agriculture that offers a significant opportunity to reduce its demand for water. However, technical solutions to save water in agriculture will play only a small role due to the high costs.

Changes in the world’s agriculture and eating habits need to be re-examined

Hunger follows on the heels of water scarcity

Agriculture must change in order to counter dwindling water resources. Climate researchers warn of an increased risk of hunger, in particular in poorer countries, with farmers trying to adapt to cycles of recurring drought and extreme, torrential rains.  One way to counter these extremes is through organic farming, which strengthens the capacity of the soil to absorb water, to enrich it and later deliver it again to the plants.

Organic farming could also limit the spread of diseases and pests without farmers having to resort to pesticides.  Crop rotation and diversity would make it more difficult for diseases and crop destroyers to infest cultivated areas.  This was common practice for many generations before industrial farming began.

In addition, consumers will have to alter their habits in ways that include eating less meat and seeking out crops more attuned to local conditions.  In dry regions of the world, farmers could plant the cereal crop millet, which needs significantly less water than corn.

Another climate-friendly measure: growers and consumers should be located closer to one another to decrease theamount of shipments and transports.

Such changes would help feed a constantly growing global population.  Even today, the world produces enough food for 14 billion people.

We don’t need to produce more foodwhat we need is better quality and more diversity.

 

Source:  http://www.dw.de/climate-change-fuels-water-scarcity-and-hunger/a-17325128

 

 

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Water – “Nature’s Medicine”

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November 3  |  Editorial, Latest News, Nutrition, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

Safe drinking water is essential to humans and other lifeforms even though it provides no calories or organic nutrients.

80% of all illness in the developing world comes from waterborne diseases.

So, the most valuable medicine we could provide is a simple, clean glass of water.

Our SolarBag can help. It offers individuals and households anywhere in the world, the world’s best detoxification and disinfection solution for pennies a day.

Access to safe drinking water has improved over the last decades in almost every part of the world, but approximately one billion people still lack access to safe water and over 2.5 billion lack access to adequate sanitation.[1]

Imprtance of Water

There is a clear correlation between access to safe water and GDP per capita.[2] However, some observers have estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability.[3] A report, issued in November 2009, suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%.[4]   Approximately 70% of the fresh water used by humans goes to agriculture.[5]

References:
  1. “MDG Report 2008”. Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  2. “Public Services”, Gapminder video
  3. Kulshreshtha, S.N (1998). “A Global Outlook for Water Resources to the Year 2025”. Water Resources Management 12 (3): 167–184. doi:10.1023/A:1007957229865.
  4. “Charting Our Water Future: Economic frameworks to inform decision-making” (PDF). Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  5. Baroni, L.; Cenci, L.; Tettamanti, M.; Berati, M. (2007). “Evaluating the environmental impact of various dietary patterns combined with different food production systems”. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 61 (2): 279–286. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602522. PMID 17035955.

 

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A Letter from the Editor

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October 27  |  climate change, Editorial, Emergency Preparedness, Latest News  |   Webmaster

The summer of 2013 will certainly go into the record books as one of the wettest and most costly summers in decades.  This freakish weather was at the complete opposite end of the spectrum from the summer of 2012; remember the devastating droughts only a year ago?

As Mother Nature rampaged across North America with heavy rains, which combined with the snow-pack run-off, the flash floods resulted in billions of dollars of damage and thousands and thousands of people left homeless or without power.  In fact, the amount that insurers pay out in damage claims due to severe weather has DOUBLED every 5 to 10 years since 1980.

As we head into fall and winter, there is nothing more certain than the uncertainty of the weather and what may lie in store for us.  With businesses, farms, municipalities, and families increasing reliant on dependable power, even a short term outage can mean a significant loss in productivity, availability of safe, clean drinking water, and safe, effective waste-water treatment.

As survival expert, Pat Cascio, says, “In a disaster, most people die from dehydration or water-borne illnesses”.  It is becoming increasingly apparent that preparation for any weather extremes or emergency situations has to become second-nature to us.  Could you and your family survive for a week without electricity, fresh water, food, or the ability to get out of your home?

One of our products, the SolarBag, is ideal for this kind of situation and should be an important component of any emergency kit.  Other important items include flashlights, canned food, propane cooker, candles, and of course charged cell phones. 

Let’s all learn from our experiences and life’s repeated lessons.  Let’s make 2013 the year that we took emergency preparedness seriously, for us, our families, our neighbors, and our communities.

 

 

 

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BC Water Act

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October 19  |  climate change, Editorial, global warming, Latest News, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

B.C. Water Act To Regulate Groundwater, Force Nestle To Pay

The provincial government of British Columbia has just passed their new Water Act, after four years of research and consultations with industry, communities, and First Nations to replace outdated legislation from 1909.

The legislation is focused mainly on the allocation of water and large scale users, like Nestle, who have been able to use unlimited supplies of fresh groundwater, without cost, will now be charged a nominal fee.

While this is expected to regulate groundwater consumption, while adding to the provincial government’s coffers, many critics argue that the act does not go far enough.  In fact, environment minister Mary Polak, even admits that the act will not cover off every single aspect of water protection and water use.

Nestle Bottled Water

For a copy of the news articles by Canadian Press and the Globe & Mail, click here.

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