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Yearly Archives: 2015

Beat the Heat

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July 19  |  Emergency Preparedness, News, Newsletters, Opinion, Research  |   Webmaster

Web MD, a trusted source for professional medical information, has provided a timely special report on the importance of water during hot temperatures and other important health tips and resources to stay safe during hot summer days.

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Web MD has a dedicated team of board-certified physicians, award-winning journalists, and trained community moderators, all solely dedicated to providing accurate, timely, daily information about a wide range of personal health care concerns.  They are committed to helping people find the health and medical information, support, and services they need.

Please click on the links below for more information and feel free to subscribe to their electronic newsletter.

Take the Quiz:  How much do you know about Hydration?

Symptoms of Dehydration

Heat Stroke – Symptoms & Treatment

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World Water Day 2015

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March 22  |  climate change, Editorial, global warming, News, Nutrition, Opinion, safe drinking water, water conservation, water preservation, water stewardship  |   Webmaster

World Water Day 2015

World Water Day logo

This year’s theme is Water and Sustainable Development

Visit http://www.unwater.org/worldwaterday/ for more details.

What does WATER mean to you?  Search #wateris and #WorldWaterDay

 

We spill it, drink it, bathe in it, cook with it, flush it, run it down the drain and the gutter, drench the lawn and wash the car with it.

While we waste perfectly good water and don’t give a second thought, the following statistics should be a sober wake-up call to all of us to be more respectful and conserving of this valuable resource.  Water is truly the lifeblood of our precious earth.

  • An astounding 1,400 children die every day from diseases linked to unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation.
  • Roughly 75% of all industrial water withdrawals are used for energy production.
  • There are 658 million people living without access to water in Africa.
  • By 2035, the global energy demand is projected to grow by more than one-third.
  • Diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water, sanitation and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally, which is 2,300 people per day.
  • 750 million people lack access to clean water, which is over double the population of the United States.
  • 82% of those who lack access to improved water live in rural areas.

The water crisis is the number one global risk based on impact to society (as a measure of devastation) and the eighth global risk based on likelihood (likelihood of occurring within ten years), according to the World Economic Forum.

The UN says the planet is facing a 40% shortfall in water supply by 2030, unless the world dramatically improves the management of this precious resource.

This is the conclusion reached in the 2015 United Nations World Water Development Report, “Water for a Sustainable World” launched in New Delhi ahead of World Water Day on 22 March.

The theme of 2015 it’s about how water links to all areas we need to consider to create the future we want.

water in hands

Join the 2015 campaign to raise awareness of water and sanitation. You can also contribute on social media though the hashtags #WaterIs and #WorldWaterDay.

World Water Day is marked on 22 March every year. It’s a day to celebrate water. It’s a day to make a difference for the members of the global population who suffer from water related issues. It’s a day to prepare for how we manage water in the future.

In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March as the first World Water Day. 22 years later, World Water Day is celebrated around the world every year, shining the spotlight on a different issue.

We invite you to do your own research and see how you can make a difference.  Following is a link to  a short video by the UN to get you started …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1Zwd4B_Zqw

 

 

 

 

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Drugs in Our Water

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February 8  |  antibiotics, Editorial, Immune System, News, safe drinking water  |   Webmaster

What do all these have in common?

  1. Prescription drugs such as hormones (birth control pills, estrogen replacement drugs, etc.), antidepressants, and antibiotics; and,
  2. Over-the-counter medications such as pain relievers (aspirin, ibuprofen, etc.), cold/flu remedies, and antiseptics (germ killing liquids); and,
  3. Veterinary medicines.

They have all been detected in rivers, lakes and coastal waters throughout the United States and Europe in increasing concentrations of parts per billion to parts per trillion.

There are two ways that medications enter the sewer system and wind up at a wastewater treatment plant: (1) excretion by the human body in urine and feces and (2) disposal of unused or expired medications down the toilet or drain.

Wastewater treatment plants are designed to remove conventional pollutants such as solids and biodegradable materials; they are not designed to remove man-made pollutants such as medications,  which are only partially destroyed and then discharged to rivers or the ocean. These same water bodies are the source of drinking water for many communities, so there is a growing concern about long-term health effects on humans, fish, and animals.  

The growing concern has also spawned numerous scientific studies by various governments, institutions, and NGOs.  Recent studies have found that human drugs can disrupt the biology and behavior of fish and other aquatic life at very low concentrations.  Of particular concern is the alarming increase of hormone disruptive chemicals being found in our waterways,  which affect the conception, development, puberty, and procreation.  One news report calls these “Gender Bending Chemicals” because of their effect on male development.

William Duke photo credit

 

What are the solutions?  Stop flushing unused medications, vitamins, etc. down the sink or toilet.  Lobby your municipality and local governments to install more effective processing systems, such as, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation, UV and hydrogen peroxide.

Sources used for this article:

http://paper.li/f-1366553404#!health

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/science/2015/02/06/001-medicament-eau-poissons.shtml

http://www.beachapedia.org/Drugs_in_the_Water

http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/06/17/Gender-Bending-Chemicals/

http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/11707/

http://www.jsonline.com/news/health/

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